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  #31  
Old 08-16-2017, 07:57 AM
Mr Flyguy Mr Flyguy is offline
 
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One sort of intangible value (and esteem booster) in tying your own flies is giving a few that are working or have worked to a fishing buddy, or a friend, or even a stranger at the lake/stream, and then seeing them catch fish or hearing about it. Unlikely that one will give away flies that you bought in a store for $$$'s!

Or if you're really nasty, give them some that you absolutely know won't work but claim that "that's weird, they worked for me"
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  #32  
Old 08-16-2017, 11:10 AM
Don Andersen Don Andersen is offline
 
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Buy don't tie. Tying is like cancer, it just grows and grows. Mind you, I'm not sure that my marriage would have survived the purchase of the near 5,000 flies typically carried through the summer.
And reminds me, I need more flies - Bye.

Don
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  #33  
Old 08-16-2017, 01:43 PM
32-40win 32-40win is offline
 
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I still occasionally buy some, even though I've been tying for 20+ yrs. If I am on a site or in a store that has something that looks interesting, I'll try 1/2doz to see how they work, before I bother with acquiring materials (if necc) and tying them.
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  #34  
Old 08-17-2017, 04:49 AM
ShortsideK ShortsideK is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Runewolf1973 View Post
I would never spend that kind of money on tying flies. My entire kit cost me a little over a hundred dollars and I got everything I need to make all the flies I need, including pike flies. It all fits inside a shopping basket. If you're the type that needs the most expensive, fancy vise or the most premium feathers then of course it will not be economical to tie flies. I am the creative type and I get creative when the money isn't there. You can probably find most of what you need to make some really decent pike flies from a dollar store. You won't be able to match exact patterns found in books, but you can create your own patterns. If you want to match the exact patterns of all the different flies found in books, you will no doubt spend a sh** ton of money for all the different materials you'll need. I prefer creative over costly.

Like someone above said...different strokes for different folks.
"You get what you pay for." GIGO
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  #35  
Old 08-17-2017, 01:37 PM
Runewolf1973 Runewolf1973 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by ShortsideK View Post
"You get what you pay for." GIGO
That's generally true. I paid almost $5.00 a piece for a half dozen of these grasshopper flies I bought at Bass Pro...and lost 3 nice fish because of it. I can easily make better flies with less expensive equipment. The most expensive vise is nice to have yes, but it isn't necessary to make good flies. Attention to detail is necessary.

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  #36  
Old 08-17-2017, 06:44 PM
ShortsideK ShortsideK is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Mr Flyguy View Post
One sort of intangible value (and esteem booster) in tying your own flies is giving a few that are working or have worked to a fishing buddy, or a friend, or even a stranger at the lake/stream, and then seeing them catch fish or hearing about it. Unlikely that one will give away flies that you bought in a store for $$$'s!

Or if you're really nasty, give them some that you absolutely know won't work but claim that "that's weird, they worked for me"
Hmmmmmmmm... its becoming clear as to why you destroy me out at Spring.
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  #37  
Old 08-20-2017, 09:22 AM
dmac111 dmac111 is offline
 
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Default Tying kit

Spent sometime last night organizing all the flies I have purchased over the last two years... I would say I probably have $500-$600 worth of flies. I enjoy buying them because I have two young boys and time is tough to find sometimes. But my wife pointed out something last night and basically gave me the green light. She said "you spent about two hours organizing flies, why don't you find that time and tie your own?".

Sounds like a green light to me.

All of you who tie seem like you know a lot. What would be a good starter kit to purchase? Something basic to see if I can find the time, and to see if I enjoy it? I'm sure I won't be the only one jumping into this.

Any advice would be appricated.
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  #38  
Old 08-20-2017, 10:06 AM
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jgib01 jgib01 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by dmac111 View Post
Spent sometime last night organizing all the flies I have purchased over the last two years... I would say I probably have $500-$600 worth of flies. I enjoy buying them because I have two young boys and time is tough to find sometimes. But my wife pointed out something last night and basically gave me the green light. She said "you spent about two hours organizing flies, why don't you find that time and tie your own?".

Sounds like a green light to me.

All of you who tie seem like you know a lot. What would be a good starter kit to purchase? Something basic to see if I can find the time, and to see if I enjoy it? I'm sure I won't be the only one jumping into this.

Any advice would be appricated.
2 ways to go... start with a kit, knowing that if you really "get into it" that you likely will be upgrading some of it; or start with where you might end up anyway with better quality stuff. I started a few years ago with a $50'ish Cabela's kit, which had everything I needed for tools to start doing some basic flies. I slowly started to get some better tools (bobbin almost immediately, then eventually a stacker & hackle pliers). This year I upgraded my vice to a nice Renzetti rotary, and have added lots of other tying gizmos along the way. Even though I now recognize how mediocre the vice in the kit is, I don't regret starting there as it was a good way to try things out for minimal investment. I still use several of the tools I got in that kit.

You can find an inexpensive intro kit at any of the big box stores or online. Not sure if any of the fly shops carry such beasts, as I think their market is more for upper end stuff. Minimally, you will need a vice, scissors, bobbin, whip finisher, hackle pliers, and a hair stacker. Consider where you will do most of your tying, as that may dictate if you need to have a vice with a base and/or c-clamp.
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  #39  
Old 08-20-2017, 08:54 PM
professori professori is offline
 
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ooops.
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  #40  
Old 08-20-2017, 09:06 PM
dmac111 dmac111 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by jgib01 View Post
2 ways to go... start with a kit, knowing that if you really "get into it" that you likely will be upgrading some of it; or start with where you might end up anyway with better quality stuff. I started a few years ago with a $50'ish Cabela's kit, which had everything I needed for tools to start doing some basic flies. I slowly started to get some better tools (bobbin almost immediately, then eventually a stacker & hackle pliers). This year I upgraded my vice to a nice Renzetti rotary, and have added lots of other tying gizmos along the way. Even though I now recognize how mediocre the vice in the kit is, I don't regret starting there as it was a good way to try things out for minimal investment. I still use several of the tools I got in that kit.

You can find an inexpensive intro kit at any of the big box stores or online. Not sure if any of the fly shops carry such beasts, as I think their market is more for upper end stuff. Minimally, you will need a vice, scissors, bobbin, whip finisher, hackle pliers, and a hair stacker. Consider where you will do most of your tying, as that may dictate if you need to have a vice with a base and/or c-clamp.
Beauty! Thanks for the advice. I'm going to make my way to cabelas tomorrow after work, $59.95. See if I can find the time to tie, or see if I even like to.

Thanks!
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  #41  
Old 08-31-2017, 07:42 AM
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Stryker2 Stryker2 is offline
 
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Default Tying or Buying?

Interesting thread... and everyone's opinion also very interesting! Personally I started tying flies before I learned fly fishing, I broke my knee and was stationary for a few months so I taught myself to tie flies with videos and then when I could walk again I learned how to fly fish. I would have to say that in my opinion there is no better feeling than catching a fish with your own fly! Especially when you tweaked the fly to your liking! That being said, it can get expensive if you become obsessive with the materials! I don't tie my own to save money, I tie because the winters are long and I love the hobby.
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  #42  
Old 08-31-2017, 09:01 AM
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Lornce Lornce is offline
 
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Tying is much cheaper than buying, if you don't factor in your time. There is a learning curve. A few things you should consider first.

Do I have the ability?
Do I have the dexterity?
Do I have the patience?

Like any hobby, cost is a factor. Flies today will run from $1.50 to $3 each or more. A quality fly tying vice alone will cost you $250, not to mention tools and materials. The other factor is, what is your time worth? Do you have the time to spend? Some would rather be fishing, others do not have the patience or dexterity. I have seen people drop $800 in tools and materials only to have them consigned to a box in the closet after a brief attempt at tying. In the end itís the tier's talent not the tools.

I come from 3 generations of fly fishers and Commercial tiers. Gramps taught me to tie "in hand" with no vice. Dad on the other hand tied on a simple Vice for many years..
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  #43  
Old 08-31-2017, 09:53 AM
professori professori is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lornce View Post
Tying is much cheaper than buying, if you don't factor in your time. There is a learning curve. A few things you should consider first.

Do I have the ability?
Do I have the dexterity?
Do I have the patience?

Like any hobby, cost is a factor. Flies today will run from $1.50 to $3 each or more. A quality fly tying vice alone could cost you $250, not to mention tools and materials. The other factor is, what is your time worth? Do you have the time to spend? Some would rather be fishing, others do not have the patience or dexterity. I have seen people drop $800 in tools and materials only to have them consigned to a box in the closet after a brief attempt at tying. In the end itís the tier's talent not the tools.

I come from 3 generations of fly fishers and Commercial tiers. Gramps taught me to tie "in hand" with no vice. Dad on the other hand tied on a simple Vice for many years..
Fixed it for you.
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  #44  
Old 08-31-2017, 10:38 AM
dwedmon dwedmon is offline
 
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I tried tying but soon found that materials were expensive and aside from a couple of patterns my flies looked awful.

I then tried buying online from ickyflyworks and haven't looked back since then. Their prices are very fair and the quality is great. I've had no issues with shipping or quality, and they are my go to source for flies nowadays.
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  #45  
Old 08-31-2017, 12:05 PM
scel scel is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lornce View Post
Tying is much cheaper than buying, if you don't factor in your time. There is a learning curve. A few things you should consider first.

Do I have the ability?
Do I have the dexterity?
Do I have the patience?
I would actually distill it down to these questions:
Do you have the eyesight?
Can you pay attention to minute details?
Do you have patience?

Ability and dexterity come with practice. Learning what to practice comes with the ability to pay attention to details. Learning and practice are both easier with patience. Unfortunately, knowing whether or not someone has THE patience for fly tying can likely only be determined by trying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lornce View Post
I come from 3 generations of fly fishers and Commercial tiers. Gramps taught me to tie "in hand" with no vice. Dad on the other hand tied on a simple Vice for many years..
Just thinking about this makes me happy-good jealous. When I see a father/son fishing, I often think of the memory you shared of fishing with your dad and gramps and eating beans. I fish alone most of the time, and I prefer it that way, but I the one person I would have liked to share it with is my dad.
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  #46  
Old 08-31-2017, 01:19 PM
Claymaker Claymaker is offline
 
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You should start out tying for a hobby with a kit and one of two things will happen.

One you won't really enjoy it and get into it much but wil ty a few here and there but never really take off.

Two your going to love it and be totally hooked at all the cool stuff you create and start giving your friends and family flys and different jigs you ty and there going to tell you how they work and caught fish then you are going to love it more and keep on tying and trying new patterns and materials and accumulating materials and join bunch Facebook group and network with bunch different people make good friends go to fly swaps and share tips and ideas and just be totally hooked. And not even worry about the money your spending cause it is relaxing and great way to unwInd with a few cold ones. Might start selling them and making money but if not your part of a whole other community of fishermen.

Just my two cents but I only been tying for about nine months now and absolutely love it!
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  #47  
Old 08-31-2017, 02:59 PM
badger badger is online now
 
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As soon as you start to fish chironomids seriously, you might as well start tying them. The fish seem to be really picky about the size and colour during hatches and to have the right one at the right time means carrying hundreds of them. If you are fishing standard patterns then buying them is cheaper and time efficient. If you like tying then you will always have what you need. Also, store bought flies are generally tied on cheap hooks (unless custom) and I want my hooks to be strong and sharp.

I started tying at the same time that I started fishing. Then work got busy and didn't have the time and limited days to get out on the river so I bought a few. The first time I caught a fish on a fly that was bought I felt ashamed. So to me fly fishing is about tying your own flies. These are about half the chironomids I carry in the boat and there's no way I would be buying that many flies.
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  #48  
Old 08-31-2017, 04:47 PM
Mr Flyguy Mr Flyguy is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by professori View Post
Fixed it for you.
Well not completely: for the 1 millionth time, it's vise not vice, although excessive tying might be considered a vice in some circles.
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  #49  
Old 08-31-2017, 09:40 PM
SNAPFisher SNAPFisher is offline
 
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Originally Posted by badger View Post
As soon as you start to fish chironomids seriously, you might as well start tying them. The fish seem to be really picky about the size and colour during hatches and to have the right one at the right time means carrying hundreds of them. If you are fishing standard patterns then buying them is cheaper and time efficient. If you like tying then you will always have what you need. Also, store bought flies are generally tied on cheap hooks (unless custom) and I want my hooks to be strong and sharp.

I started tying at the same time that I started fishing. Then work got busy and didn't have the time and limited days to get out on the river so I bought a few. The first time I caught a fish on a fly that was bought I felt ashamed. So to me fly fishing is about tying your own flies. These are about half the chironomids I carry in the boat and there's no way I would be buying that many flies.
Aright, I'll start the bidding for that chironomid collection. I bid $1.00

Seriously that is one great looking collection...mine is so messy looking compared to that. And that is only half you say...okay....$2.00 then
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  #50  
Old 08-31-2017, 10:51 PM
commieboy commieboy is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Flyguy View Post
Well not completely: for the 1 millionth time, it's vise not vice, although excessive tying might be considered a vice in some circles.
Vise is an American spelling. VICE is the accepted British spelling of the word for a device which grips objects between jaws.
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  #51  
Old 08-31-2017, 10:52 PM
commieboy commieboy is offline
 
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Originally Posted by badger View Post
This made me hungry.
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  #52  
Old 09-01-2017, 12:08 AM
Fenix_84 Fenix_84 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badger View Post
As soon as you start to fish chironomids seriously, you might as well start tying them.
Bingo, this is exactly the reason why i started. I felt my chironomid selection was poor and now its not.
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  #53  
Old 09-01-2017, 07:58 AM
SNAPFisher SNAPFisher is offline
 
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Bingo, this is exactly the reason why i started. I felt my chironomid selection was poor and now its not.
Yep, and they are easy to tie. Pretty hard to justify spending $2.50 on a chironimid that is a bit of thread, a bead, a tiny bit of some kind of ribbing and maybe some white floss or other material to imitate gills (optional). You can tie a lot of these and hardly slow down with 5-6 beer in you
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  #54  
Old 09-01-2017, 01:34 PM
dwedmon dwedmon is offline
 
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Very true. This was the only pattern I tied that looked decent.
All other patterns I buy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SNAPFisher View Post
Yep, and they are easy to tie. Pretty hard to justify spending $2.50 on a chironimid that is a bit of thread, a bead, a tiny bit of some kind of ribbing and maybe some white floss or other material to imitate gills (optional). You can tie a lot of these and hardly slow down with 5-6 beer in you
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  #55  
Old 09-07-2017, 02:24 PM
Tcon Tcon is offline
 
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I'd need a second job to afford steelheading if I didn't tie my own intruders.
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