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  #31  
Old 06-24-2019, 08:45 AM
big zeke big zeke is offline
 
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We use one of those collapsible garbage cans for empty pop & juice containers. We keep it outside on the mat and drop one piece of firewood in the bottom so it doesn't blow away. When done we zip it shut, put it in the bathtub and empty it at home. Make sure to rinse it out and let it dry before collapsing it back for storage (otherwise some weird stuff grows inside).

An axe, a backup axe, extra power cord, 2 power adapters (30amp to 15 amp)a spare water pressure regulator, spare levelling blocks (2X6 works fine), spare sewer hose end fittings & clamps. The list goes on and on.

We pack a lot of stuff but I know the moment I unpack it we'll need it
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  #32  
Old 06-24-2019, 08:48 AM
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Okotok Okotok is offline
 
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A couple of 2" x 6" and a 1" x 6" planks long enough to catch both wheels on a side for levelling before you put your stabilizer jacks down. A 2' level to put on the floor of the trailer to ensure you are level. Those little stick on ones on the outside aren't the best.
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  #33  
Old 06-24-2019, 09:08 AM
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Coreyh Coreyh is offline
 
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A cheque book.
A chainsaw.

A number of years ago I took my 3 yr old son on what was to be a week long trip in our tent trailer down the FTR, staying at Provincial Recreation Areas along the way. We started south of Edson (an area that I frequent) where sites were $5/night but when we got to areas west of Rocky Mountain House, sites were $25/night. I blew through my stack of $5 bills in a big hurry and it put an early end to the trip.
Now I just scratch out a cheque without worrying about how much cash I have on hand.

The ability to get your own firewood is handy. Not all places supply it, sometimes it costs extra, sometimes it costs A LOT extra.
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  #34  
Old 06-24-2019, 09:33 AM
Tungsten, Tungsten, is offline
 
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multi meter to check your battery voltage.
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  #35  
Old 06-24-2019, 09:35 AM
Tungsten, Tungsten, is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Okotok View Post
A couple of 2" x 6" and a 1" x 6" planks long enough to catch both wheels on a side for levelling before you put your stabilizer jacks down. A 2' level to put on the floor of the trailer to ensure you are level. Those little stick on ones on the outside aren't the best.
yes,and its the last thing that goes into the truck.since its the first thing you need.
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  #36  
Old 06-24-2019, 09:50 AM
BUSHRVN BUSHRVN is online now
 
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Location: Devon/Spruce Grove
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-sewer hose extensions (some sites suck with utilities placements)(and good ones like Rhino
-clear 4" elbow so you can see when you've flushed the tanks enough(running clear)
-30 amp ext. cord, same reasons as above
-extra propane regulator (sucks when they fail in the bush)
-various hose clamps, fittings etc.
-roof patch materials like Eternabond tape, and self leveling roofing caulking and gun
-aluminum foil tape, good for emergency patch jobs on the trailer, like a hole in the fiberglass sides etc.
-can of spray foam for underside hole filling(mouse prevention)
-basic tools (usually on my truck anyway)
-welding machine to repair trailer frames (have done this in the bush)(not something I carry though)
-lots of blocks (2x6's)for leveling as some site really suck for being reasonably level
-hatchet, axe, wiener sticks, pie irons
-wheel chocks like X-chock for securing trailer and reduce rockin and rolling
-Tire pressure monitoring system for trailer tires
-side rails on exterior of trailer for hanging BBQ, shelves etc.
-aux. propane hook up by BBQ location
-aux. power connection at front of trailer for plugging in generator in the back of the truck without having to get out a mile of cord
-PROPER QUALITY TIRES!!! not china bombs!
-led light at the back of the trailer for night time parking
-lights in all storage compartments for night time searching and long dark storage compartments
-led lights on the sides of the vanity mirror for the wifey
-extra shelving inside cupboards for better storage
-jack stabizers to help trailer rocking (three teenagers move allot!)
There's more!
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  #37  
Old 06-24-2019, 09:51 AM
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Stinky Buffalo Stinky Buffalo is offline
 
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Some great suggestions here.

For me, the LED lights and the 6V batteries definitely helped, along with a solar panel. We don't have a microwave or AC, so no generator required for shorter boondocking.

One great thing we added was a Fantastic Fan - definitely helps keep the air moving well on those hotter days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bat119 View Post
12volt impact driver with a 3/4” socket to level the jacks makes life much easier
This is great, just make sure you don't use it during quiet time!
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  #38  
Old 06-24-2019, 02:45 PM
barbless barbless is offline
 
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If you don't have yet on your roof vents look at getting some Max Air vents to cover them. They will holdup better than the ones on there especially after a couple years sitting in the sun and the odd hail storm. Bonus also you can leave them open even in the rain. Easy to install.
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  #39  
Old 06-24-2019, 02:54 PM
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nast70 nast70 is online now
 
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I will throw in have your significant other learn all the systems and procedures for breaking up camp, hooking up and driving. Never know when you might be sick or hurt bad enough that you can't do it.
I also bring a couple smaller foldable tables, one outside by the door with the dog leashes and a mosquito lamp. The other comes out for cooking or campfire time.
I don't have good functional levels on my rig, my wife just uses a small level on the wall, when i'm up on the blocks she tells me to stop.
We used to use hand held radios to communicate backing up, but find a couple simple hand gestures do the trick.
Pro Tip: Keep all the smaller things in containers that stack up neatly inside the trailers storage areas. Think about mosquito repellants and sunscreens in one container. All the kids toys and games in another. Makes packing up and unpacking much easier. everything has its spot and messes or spills are contained.
I will also throw in, keep your owners manual in the rig, read it and familiarize yourself with the manual overrides incase of malfunctions. Imagine your slide won't go in, or your landing gear wont go up.
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  #40  
Old 06-24-2019, 03:13 PM
barbless barbless is offline
 
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Depending how short everyone is a small step stool is handy to reach into the back of the top cupboards. A basin like for soaking and cleaning ones feet but not for that use. Can be used to stack dishes after washing but the best part I like about that is you can bring lots of food and spices and your plates out all at once for cooking.
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  #41  
Old 06-24-2019, 03:24 PM
jcrayford jcrayford is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nast70 View Post
I will throw in have your significant other learn all the systems and procedures for breaking up camp, hooking up and driving. Never know when you might be sick or hurt bad enough that you can't do it.
I also bring a couple smaller foldable tables, one outside by the door with the dog leashes and a mosquito lamp. The other comes out for cooking or campfire time.
I don't have good functional levels on my rig, my wife just uses a small level on the wall, when i'm up on the blocks she tells me to stop.
We used to use hand held radios to communicate backing up, but find a couple simple hand gestures do the trick.
Pro Tip: Keep all the smaller things in containers that stack up neatly inside the trailers storage areas. Think about mosquito repellants and sunscreens in one container. All the kids toys and games in another. Makes packing up and unpacking much easier. everything has its spot and messes or spills are contained.
I will also throw in, keep your owners manual in the rig, read it and familiarize yourself with the manual overrides incase of malfunctions. Imagine your slide won't go in, or your landing gear wont go up.
We started out 8 years ago using radios (to keep the screaming over the diesel down to a minimum), but both the WD and I learned to "read" the campsite. Since then, she walks to the back of the campsite to where the back drivers corner of the trailer needs to be, and I back the trailer in so that the side of the trailer runs right down the middle of her chest. The only thing she flags me down is for low hanging branches and such that I'm not concentrating on.

J.
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  #42  
Old 06-24-2019, 03:41 PM
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Albertadiver Albertadiver is online now
 
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In no particular order here are things I’ve utilized….

Large socket set for tire changes and hot water tank draining
Teflon tape
Electrical tape
Spare fuses
Wire cutter / stripper
Multitool
Multipurpose screwdriver
Awning tape
Duct tape
Zip ties
Hydraulic jack for tire changes
Extra pins for hitch or levelling bars (they seem to disappear)
Hitch locks
Wheel chocks
2x6’s for leveling
4x4’s for stabilizer jacks
Cordless drill and bit for the stabilizer jacks
Heavy duty extension cord and 50/30 amp adapters
Surge protector
Water funnel or pump to top up fresh water
Turd tote
Vinyl gloves
Broom
RV mat
Outside table
Tarps and rope
I have 150watts solar on the roof with a 2000watt inverter that has a transfer switch on the converter. Seamless full AC power off of batteries / solar.
Portable 150 watt solar that I can move around if the roof mounted solar is obscured. Total 300 watts solar
RV tank treatment
RV toilet paper (Very important)
Portable air compressor that plugs into car DC power
Extra caps for water tank drain and low point drains
LED lights
Max air fan in the bedroom
Max air covers (you can have your upper vents open in a rain and get really good hail protection)
Dicor roof caulking
Propane torch
Longer sewer hose for bad RV dumps
Zip lock bags
Spare keys in your vehicle or hidden somewhere
Adjustable pipe wrench
10 ply tires
X-chocks
Extra propane tank
Marriage counselor
Extra blanket for unexpected visitor
2 6v trojan deep cycle batteries
Garbage bags
Bin for cans
Bearspray
Multimeter
Portable electric heater
Step ladder (I have a three step and use it a lot for tarp shelters)
Small bins for things that stay in the trailer like spices, movies, batteries, etc.
hose clamps





Some of these things I’ve never needed, but the majority have been used at one point or other. If I recall other things I’ll add…..

Last edited by Albertadiver; 06-24-2019 at 03:56 PM.
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  #43  
Old 06-24-2019, 04:21 PM
Tungsten, Tungsten, is offline
 
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Hole saw so your patio umbrella fits into the picnic table.
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  #44  
Old 06-24-2019, 04:22 PM
partsman partsman is offline
 
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Location: Port Coquitlam B.C.
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Torque wrench
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  #45  
Old 06-24-2019, 04:48 PM
IceDemeter IceDemeter is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 93
Default A couple of things I haven't seen mentioned yet...

A couple of things that I found made RV packing / life easier:

- A few fair sized sheets of flat box cardboard (at least 2' x 3'), which we used both outside of the main door and inside (great for wet, mucky weather since it holds the water / dirt from the boots --- then can be burned or recycled when you leave without having to bother trying to pack a wet, dirty carpet). We always had a few larger sheets, too, which were stored in one of the compartments, or under the sofa cushions, and could be used for the same purpose, or for some cushioning when needing to work underneath the trailer / truck / boat.

- A few hard-sided laundry hampers with reinforced handles - which were used for packing dishes / towels / sheets / pantry items / toiletries / pots and pans. For example, a full set of stoneware or porcelain dishes can be slid in to a couple of folded bath sheets, then plopped in to the hamper for safe travel and easy use / unpacking). The nice thing with the hampers is that they are easy to carry, and are open to the air so it's not a big deal to be packing things immediately after washing (a bit of dampness left on dishes or pots in a sealed container can make for a nasty surprise after being left in a sealed trailer for a few weeks), they are stackable when not in use, and they are easy to clean when you decide to use it for something else while camping (handy for carrying kindling or split wood, for instance, or taking kids' toys down to the beach). I had a couple of each of these: https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/t...9305p.html#srp and https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/s...7009p.html#srp

- Lots of clothesline, in different lengths (ends up used for drying clothes, hanging tarps, securing loads, and multiple other things).

- Headlamps for every family member, with a couple of spares and lots of spare batteries.

- Multiple containers of waterproof matches / candles / lighters / fire-lighter (homemade or purchased) kept in various places accessible from inside and outside (a single set will manage to disappear in to another dimension when you really need it - better to have a few choices).

- A couple of old-fashioned hot water bottles with covers. These are awesome in cooler weather when filled with hot water, or when filled with cold water in hotter weather. Useful when trying to sleep, or for keeping backs warm when sitting around the fire.
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  #46  
Old 06-24-2019, 04:49 PM
operator john operator john is offline
 
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Posts: 123
Smile RV needs

We have five lists. Much of the stuff is overlap.
1) RV campsite with all amenities. Never leave black water valve open. All liquid will drain away leaving solids and toilet paper behind. Not pretty.

2) RV boonie camping list

3) RV boonie camping with ATV

4) RV boonie camping with ATV and hunting

5) RV boonie camping with ATV, hunting and fishing.

My wife and I have our duties when setting up or breaking down camp. She looks after inside and I look after everything outside.

Last on the list is do a final walk around. Make sure nothing is left behind and final vehicle walk around.
Be sure to check all lights and braking system.
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  #47  
Old 06-24-2019, 05:42 PM
rawhide rawhide is offline
 
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BEER
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  #48  
Old 06-24-2019, 07:41 PM
Tannerdog Tannerdog is offline
 
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Axe (mentioned above)
Fire starter (Lots of times have cardboard/wrappers). Better to have some newspaper or fire starter sticks
Lawn chairs
Extra Tarp (12x16 or....), 100' of 1/4 rope. If it rains, gets real tight under the awning
Good pocket knife for above mentioned rope (and everything else)
If camping off the grid, chainsaw.
Good propane lantern.
Shovel and bucket/jug for water. Clean out fire pit, level ground. Both needed for random fire pit.
Tin foil......lots
Coffee. Keurig if you have power, stove perk or boiled water for instant.
Salt and pepper (obviously), spices and paper towel......again, lots.
i'm sure the list goes on.....
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  #49  
Old 06-24-2019, 08:01 PM
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Dewey Cox Dewey Cox is offline
 
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Corkscrew
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  #50  
Old 06-24-2019, 08:01 PM
MRM MRM is offline
 
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If you have a folding table with steel legs, cut 4 pieces of 1 1/4" PVC pipe to 14". Slide the table legs into them and it will bring the table up to kitchen counter height. Best cheap hack in my camping setup. Saves the back when cooking and cleaning, so I hear....
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  #51  
Old 06-24-2019, 08:07 PM
kbobbeck kbobbeck is offline
 
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maul for splitting firewood, a coleman extreme cooler for beverages, keeps people out of the fridge and saves room.
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  #52  
Old 06-24-2019, 08:27 PM
curtz curtz is offline
 
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If you cook outside a lot and have room, get your self a three burner camp chef stove.
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  #53  
Old 06-25-2019, 06:37 AM
Unregistered user Unregistered user is offline
 
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Can of Sani foam for the outhouse toilet seats
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  #54  
Old 06-25-2019, 07:06 AM
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bat119 bat119 is offline
 
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A utility trailer to haul all the stuff suggested in this thread
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  #55  
Old 06-25-2019, 07:58 AM
Jays toyz Jays toyz is offline
 
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I've been camping for 20 years and don't have half the minutia that you guys do.
Tote of dry fire wood and kindling. Having nothing but soaked aspen at the campsite sucks, but with a hot fire at least you can burn the crap wood that's left in the pile.
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  #56  
Old 06-25-2019, 08:24 AM
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Stinky Buffalo Stinky Buffalo is offline
 
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I have one of these for getting fires started:



Just have to be careful, sometimes a well-meaning "helper" will think the thing is designed to move logs around in the fire, and the end will melt/fall off (had to build new ends a few times on mine).

However, it sure is handy for getting a fire going! I have been accused of "cheating" by using it, but then the complainers eventually quiet down when they sidle up to the warming blaze that ensues.
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  #57  
Old 06-25-2019, 08:48 AM
Ehgun Ehgun is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CranePete View Post
We did two things right away. Swapped out the single 12V deep cycle for two 6V deep cycle batteries. Changed all of the incandescent bulbs to LED.
Yup.
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  #58  
Old 06-25-2019, 10:22 AM
walker1 walker1 is offline
 
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Get to a weigh scale after you load up as the trailer will never be that skinny again! I hate to see the number of people that go down the road with no clue what their combo weighs. "salesmen said my truck will pull it!!!" Dry stickers can be off and if a fifth wheel ( I know you asked about TT), they require payload not tow ratings!!!
Good luck.
We leave Calgary for California sunday. 3 week road trip!
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  #59  
Old 06-25-2019, 12:32 PM
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6.5 shooter 6.5 shooter is offline
 
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Change tires after 5 years no matter what.
Do buy the best stabilizing hitch you can afford.
Buy a good black water hose, Have a cheap blue one just in case.
I tried the electric drill idea...Princes auto ones SUCK.
I swapped out my small 20# propane tanks for 30# from Costco can never have to much fuel.

If you can't light a fire with one match..you need to learn....
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Trades I would interested in:

-.22 Hornet or K Hornet
- light weight walking rifle in .204
- Anything in 6.5mm.
- Sightron rifle scopes, 4.5x14x42mm or 4x16x42mm especially! with the HHR reticule.
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  #60  
Old 06-25-2019, 12:49 PM
Unregistered user Unregistered user is offline
 
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If your black tank won't dump all the greeblies, fill it to the top with water at the sani dump, have someone hold the handle in flush mode and let 'er rip. All that goo will be pulled out but make sure the hose is well set in the hole or it may buck out on you.
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