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Old 09-14-2019, 06:38 PM
Hogie135 Hogie135 is offline
 
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Default Killing an animal

I dont know if I'm over sensitive or not. I love hunting. I love taking an animal that I've hunted. I love the whole process and dont usually have second thoughts. When I see my pics of my kills or when I see pics of others kills I have I big sense of remorse. I have feelings for the animal taken. Is it normal? I'm not sure. I dont take, taking a life easy. I love it, but I hate it.
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Old 09-14-2019, 06:51 PM
Mavrick Mavrick is offline
 
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If you didn't feel that way you wouldn't be normal. I take animal lives both on the farm and in the wild every season. Respect and use what I kill is what controls any remorse I might feel.
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Old 09-14-2019, 06:59 PM
guywiththemule guywiththemule is offline
 
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You are a human being(a predator)... animals are prey or competition predators ... you have the largest brain(you can thank the animal`s spirit if it makes you feel better) .. you decide when,where and why to take an animal.. Live with your choice...
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:09 PM
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3blade 3blade is offline
 
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You have a young kid at home? Lot of guys report these kind of feelings after becoming a parent. Hormones I guess

IMO most people arenít natural predators. That why there are those ďstages of being a hunterĒ, defines how a lot of guys focus on other (not killing) parts of the process throughout their hunting careers.

Some guys are natural at and comfortable with killing. Those are the guys with full freezers and no concern for inches, who usually camp solo and pack meat out. Precise, dedicated, lethal.

I describe it as ďguys who like huntingĒ vs ďhuntersĒ...though I admit thatís a bit vague. Guys who like hunting will go through the phases and have varying emotions and practices. Sounds like thatís where your at. Nothing wrong with being either one, and both categories can have very successful hunting lives.
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:32 PM
Hogie135 Hogie135 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by 3blade View Post
You have a young kid at home? Lot of guys report these kind of feelings after becoming a parent. Hormones I guess

IMO most people arenít natural predators. That why there are those ďstages of being a hunterĒ, defines how a lot of guys focus on other (not killing) parts of the process throughout their hunting careers.

Some guys are natural at and comfortable with killing. Those are the guys with full freezers and no concern for inches, who usually camp solo and pack meat out. Precise, dedicated, lethal.

I describe it as ďguys who like huntingĒ vs ďhuntersĒ...though I admit thatís a bit vague. Guys who like hunting will go through the phases and have varying emotions and practices. Sounds like thatís where your at. Nothing wrong with being either one, and both categories can have very successful hunting lives.
When I'm hunting, and its game on I dont think about it. Is what it is. Afterwards, I think about it. I love what I do. But I also respect what I kill, and sometimes I fell bad for killing.
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:34 PM
Hogie135 Hogie135 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by 3blade View Post
You have a young kid at home? Lot of guys report these kind of feelings after becoming a parent. Hormones I guess

IMO most people arenít natural predators. That why there are those ďstages of being a hunterĒ, defines how a lot of guys focus on other (not killing) parts of the process throughout their hunting careers.

Some guys are natural at and comfortable with killing. Those are the guys with full freezers and no concern for inches, who usually camp solo and pack meat out. Precise, dedicated, lethal.

I describe it as ďguys who like huntingĒ vs ďhuntersĒ...though I admit thatís a bit vague. Guys who like hunting will go through the phases and have varying emotions and practices. Sounds like thatís where your at. Nothing wrong with being either one, and both categories can have very successful hunting lives.
I'm older than you think. Got kids.
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:57 PM
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Cant really provide any more insight man, Iím firmly in the second category. Get super stoked whether itís a 60Ē bull, doe whitetail or snowshoe hare. I love the smell of fresh meat, the knife work, the memories, and definitely the meals. No remorse. Look at the pics (or freezer) and feel pure pride and happiness.

Ive seen the other side (stages, emotions) happen to many others, so I dont think thereís anything wrong with you.

Maybe camp out in a tent for a few days without any food...go hunt for it. Takes all the BS out of it and brings back that sense of an immediate primal need.
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:59 PM
Twobucks Twobucks is offline
 
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I donít think itís weird at all. I kill two or three big game animals every year and a bunch birds. We eat it all and buy almost no meat in the store. I donít love killing things. I love the hunting more than anything and Iím just as happy watching wildlife go about itís business. But I canít imagine ever stopping.

Not everybody feels like you or I, but thereís nothing wrong with it either.
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Old 09-14-2019, 08:07 PM
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I certainly feel remorse after killing something but not as much as with the first couple. The first times I went hunting was as a tag-along and I was already in my 30's; I didn't hunt or even have a firearm, I was just invited by an older co-worker and thought "Hey, why not?". I was not exposed to hunting as a child or anything, so it took a bit to get some of that urban-raised kid squeamishness drilled out of me, but I was determined that I had to do just that. I think its normal to have a bit of remorse and to show respect to the critters you'll soon be digesting.

For me this is way more a thing for mammals than for fish, I can't really feel anything for fish at all.
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Old 09-14-2019, 08:17 PM
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When I was a kid I was ruthless killer birds, gophers, skunks everything I could. Now I have much more respect for life. If I kill it Iím going the eat it or use it somehow. Edible game I always have a little silent moment in thanks. Then back to business bringing the meat home for the family. The best way I feel to respect the animals you kill is to use them the best you can.

Gophers on the other hand I still like to vaporize them. I havenít grown out of that.
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Old 09-14-2019, 08:55 PM
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I've never taken a picture of a wild or farmed animal that I've killed. I keep my memories in my head and most of them are of the exquisite meals that I prepare.
I only kill what is edible and I empathize with every creature that I consume. However, I feel no remorse as nature is cruel and I'm simply doing my best to be a part of it.
I go out of my way to ensure that no unnecessary suffering is imparted on the critter in the process, be it by cutting the throat on a pig, putting an extra round into a deers' head or bonking a fish. Hunting/butchering is but a satellite hobby to my gastronomic propensity.
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Old 09-14-2019, 09:19 PM
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I love to hunt & fish, eat more steak than I should, have great respect for food animals & wild game. I can't imagine getting to the hunter stages, my dad didn't, he was hunting in his 80's.

Sure don't think there's anything wrong with either position though.
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Old 09-14-2019, 09:52 PM
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The hunting is exciting but the killing is very somber and humbling. I do not feel elation or excitement when I shoot an animal. I am the reaper when pulling the trigger. After I feel thankful and relief to have succeeded. I could never figure out how some consider killing fun. Fun can have a broad definition I guess.
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Old 09-15-2019, 06:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hogie135 View Post
I dont know if I'm over sensitive or not. I love hunting. I love taking an animal that I've hunted. I love the whole process and dont usually have second thoughts. When I see my pics of my kills or when I see pics of others kills I have I big sense of remorse. I have feelings for the animal taken. Is it normal? I'm not sure. I dont take, taking a life easy. I love it, but I hate it.
It's normal.....your ok.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:00 AM
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Donít lose site of the fact that cropping and controlling game populations is a conservation tool. Itís not just about sport and meat.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:24 AM
Bigwoodsman Bigwoodsman is offline
 
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I always enjoyed the hunt. The kill was part of the hunt, too me it was, what made the hunt successful. That being said I never had to kill something for the hunt to be fun. I hunted with my dad at a very young age and hunted up until a couple of years ago. I still go out with the dog, and when I do itís for the hunt not the kill as the guns stay home. I like the early morning or the late afternoons. Itís about getting out of the city, admittedly Iím usually carrying a camera and a fishing rod.

I only recall one hunt where I wish I hadnít been there. It wasnít because of the hunt it was a result of the people in the hunt. The hunt was very successful 3 antelope out of four tags. The unsuccessful hunter had opportunities to fill his tag yet when the end of our hunt was near and we were packing up he went on a rant blaming everyone of us successful hunters for his failures. It was a long drive home and I never hunted with him again.

BW
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:44 AM
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I think that just shows some respect that you have. Not saying that people who don't feel this way have no respect. Some show it differently. I kind of mentally thank the animal when I first kneel down and pick up their head. That's when I show my feelings. You've been waiting since this time last year for this moment. That's a lot of build up. Keep having respect and keep filling your freezer with delicious ground and steaks!
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Old 09-15-2019, 10:30 AM
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That's how vegetarians feel when they mow the lawn.
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Old 09-15-2019, 10:38 AM
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regonian _winesmile
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That's how vegetarians feel when they mow the lawn.
😂😂😂
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Old 09-15-2019, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Dewey Cox View Post
That's how vegetarians feel when they mow the lawn.
The trick is to convince them that plants can feel pain. Once they believe that, then what.
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Old 09-15-2019, 02:17 PM
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Imo if you donít feel even just a little bit of sadness after taking an animal, youíre a psychopath.
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  #22  
Old 09-15-2019, 02:45 PM
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All part of it.
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Old 09-15-2019, 02:52 PM
Ronaround Ronaround is offline
 
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i dont feel for the animal i take if i didn't raise it and feed it and care for it.
Then it seems a bit harder.
Take WT buck or Big Moose it front of me then Game on. Its a blood lust all the way to termination.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:01 PM
Mulehahn Mulehahn is offline
 
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I love the hunt, the stalk, the feeling of success when you are flipping the safety off and have all the time in the world because the animal has no idea you are there. Then the seconds after I pull the trigger and I know it was a clean hit my stomach drops out. I just killed something. But it quickly passes and as I am walking up to the animal I am the happiest I have ever been. It instantly becomes fun again. I have even come to love the heavy pack out.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:06 PM
Bushleague Bushleague is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Bullets View Post
The hunting is exciting but the killing is very somber and humbling. I do not feel elation or excitement when I shoot an animal. I am the reaper when pulling the trigger. After I feel thankful and relief to have succeeded. I could never figure out how some consider killing fun. Fun can have a broad definition I guess.
Absolute best description of the complex emotions involved in killing a wild animal. I've hunted with a few guys who hoot and holler and do high fives, and frankly that type of behaviour kills my buzz to say the least. Its a friggin' funeral for Christ sakes, conduct yourself with dignity.

That said, I have had to put down a couple pets over the years... shooting something that trusts me is something I never really seem to get over completely.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mavrick View Post
If you didn't feel that way you wouldn't be normal. I take animal lives both on the farm and in the wild every season. Respect and use what I kill is what controls any remorse I might feel.
I agree 100%

Although I'm not religious, I spend a minute or 2 with the animal after the kill.
Thank it for it life, admire its beauty and such.
Makes me feel at peace with what I've done.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:14 PM
Xiph0id Xiph0id is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Bushleague View Post
Absolute best description of the complex emotions involved in killing a wild animal. I've hunted with a few guys who hoot and holler and do high fives, and frankly that type of behaviour kills my buzz to say the least. Its a friggin' funeral for Christ sakes, conduct yourself with dignity.

That said, I have had to put down a couple pets over the years... shooting something that trusts me is something I never really seem to get over completely.
Another reply I agree with.

The pet thing is tough. Only time my wife has ever seen me cry.
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Old 09-15-2019, 09:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grouse_hunter View Post
I've never taken a picture of a wild or farmed animal that I've killed. I keep my memories in my head and most of them are of the exquisite meals that I prepare.
I only kill what is edible and I empathize with every creature that I consume. However, I feel no remorse as nature is cruel and I'm simply doing my best to be a part of it.
I go out of my way to ensure that no unnecessary suffering is imparted on the critter in the process, be it by cutting the throat on a pig, putting an extra round into a deers' head or bonking a fish. Hunting/butchering is but a satellite hobby to my gastronomic propensity.
Iím with you, Iíve never taken a picture of an animal Iíve killed. I donít see the need. With my job I kill way more animals than I would have ever thought and take no joy in it. (Most are injured some how etc...) if I sit and dwell on what all hunting includes I get kind of depressed at the killing part. However During the hunt with an animal in front of me Iíve only ever let one go, a small forkhorn buck. Figured Iíd let him grow up a little. I also wouldnít shoot a doe or cow with young of the year etc... so to the OP your normal. I talk with hundreds of hunters every season while out checking licenses and the number of old timers that are more interested in getting out into the woods than harvesting game is amazing. They seem to get pretty sentimental the older they get as they recall successful hunts of yesteryear and donít show as much interest in harvesting anything. To me behaving and feeling like that means you hunt for the right reasons and you have a deep respect for your prey. Your not just a bloodthirsty moron wanting to kill for the sake of killing.
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Old 09-15-2019, 09:39 PM
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I am with you on the feeling of remorse about taking a life. Now that someone mentioned it, it may have started after my son was born. I generally hunt the same herd of mule deer year after year, and I enjoy seeing the fawns in the spring, watching the bucks grow on cameras, finding a buck or two to focus on, and trying to seal the deal with my bow. I also like seeing wild pheasants around so I don't hunt them. If I find a snake on the road (which I do lots up by my work), i move the off and to a spot where they can get sun safely. I guess the point I am trying to make is that I enjoy seeing animals year round and wish for that to continue whether I can harvest them or not.
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Old 09-16-2019, 06:03 AM
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I think its a good thing. Im not a huge hunter yet but with the thousands of fish that ive dealt with the older and more experienced i get the more i am super diligent to not waste a life that ive taken. Makes me feel ashamed if something youve chosen to kill then goes bad in a freezer or wasnt cleaned nicely by someone who doesnt give a ****. When i was younger i didnt have the same view necassarily and looking back i do feel a bit bad about certain things i had done to the fish regarding not having the proper respect for it( and i rate other mammal type animals a bit higher on the totem pole for some unknown reason too).

Its a good battle to have i think because i can relate alot more and i think you would be less likely to do something to that animal that is a waste - such as clean it poorly etc. its kinda a strange double edged sword - but a good one i believe.
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