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  #1  
Old 09-16-2019, 12:43 PM
Katie4u Katie4u is offline
 
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Question Totally New to Archery

Hi Everyone I'm totally new to Archery!

I just purchased a used Center Point Sniper 370 Crossbow yesterday.

I have had it looked at and all is good with it, I've purchased what I need for it.

I'm wondering though, where the best place I can shoot it for target practice is in Edmonton (Archery indoor or outdoor clubs) or surrounding areas?

Any tips for a Newbie?

Thanks
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  #2  
Old 09-16-2019, 01:29 PM
twinwoodsman twinwoodsman is offline
 
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I am from Calgary, so i can't help with the club search, but i know that none of the clubs that i have been to (or even called for that matter) will let you shoot a cross bow at there targets. your best bet might be buying a cross bow rated target for your self and finding a field that you can practice in.
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Old 09-16-2019, 02:15 PM
bobtodrick bobtodrick is offline
 
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Originally Posted by twinwoodsman View Post
I am from Calgary, so i can't help with the club search, but i know that none of the clubs that i have been to (or even called for that matter) will let you shoot a cross bow at there targets. your best bet might be buying a cross bow rated target for your self and finding a field that you can practice in.
Pretty much the same in Edmonton. Crossbows are more powerful than other types and wreak havoc on the butts, which have to be replaced more frequently with crossbow use.
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Old 09-16-2019, 02:32 PM
Jdunbar Jdunbar is offline
 
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Wyld archery just off yellowhead and jimbows off messier is where I’ve been going myself, I’m new to the xbow scene as well, they been pretty decent at both places.

As well as yes a personal target helps a lot, I’ve picked one up from cabelas for I think 70-80$ on sale
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  #5  
Old 09-17-2019, 05:45 AM
FinnDawg FinnDawg is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinwoodsman View Post
I am from Calgary, so i can't help with the club search, but i know that none of the clubs that i have been to (or even called for that matter) will let you shoot a cross bow at there targets. your best bet might be buying a cross bow rated target for your self and finding a field that you can practice in.
I’m pretty sure Jim Bows allows xbow on their range.
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  #6  
Old 09-17-2019, 06:55 AM
Katie4u Katie4u is offline
 
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Smile Thank you to Everyone that responded!

I'm totally excited about starting a new venture with Archery!

Any further tips for a newbie?

Thank you
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  #7  
Old 09-17-2019, 07:01 AM
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Lefty-Canuck Lefty-Canuck is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie4u View Post
Hi Everyone I'm totally new to Archery!

I just purchased a used Center Point Sniper 370 Crossbow yesterday.

I have had it looked at and all is good with it, I've purchased what I need for it.

I'm wondering though, where the best place I can shoot it for target practice is in Edmonton (Archery indoor or outdoor clubs) or surrounding areas?

Any tips for a Newbie?

Thanks
You may know already but X-Bow are not legal during archery only season UNLESS you obtain the permit needed to use it with injury or disability. In Alberta a crossbow does not meet the definition of “archery equipment”.

Most archery clubs do not allow X-Bow use for the reason above, they are very hard on targets, especially at closer range.

LC
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Old 09-20-2019, 07:35 AM
Joe Black Joe Black is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post
You may know already but X-Bow are not legal during archery only season UNLESS you obtain the permit needed to use it with injury or disability. In Alberta a crossbow does not meet the definition of “archery equipment”.

First, to answer the OP. I own a Micro 355. I looked a long time and passed on several offering as they were being discontinued.
The limbs are shorter and therefore a little more effort to cock. The Micro 360 seems to supplant the 355 although I am not sure. Excalibur's warranty is exemplary, I know first hand. Buy a Charger EXT with it if you can afford it.

Crossbows were invented in China during the Zhou dynasty, around the year 700 BC. IMO, if crossbows are to be excluded in archery season, then it stands to reason that compound bows should be excluded too since they were invented in the '70s of the last century, a mere 25 centuries after the crossbow.
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Old 09-20-2019, 08:34 AM
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Passthru Passthru is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post
You may know already but X-Bow are not legal during archery only season UNLESS you obtain the permit needed to use it with injury or disability. In Alberta a crossbow does not meet the definition of “archery equipment”.

First, to answer the OP. I own a Micro 355. I looked a long time and passed on several offering as they were being discontinued.
The limbs are shorter and therefore a little more effort to cock. The Micro 360 seems to supplant the 355 although I am not sure. Excalibur's warranty is exemplary, I know first hand. Buy a Charger EXT with it if you can afford it.

Crossbows were invented in China during the Zhou dynasty, around the year 700 BC. IMO, if crossbows are to be excluded in archery season, then it stands to reason that compound bows should be excluded too since they were invented in the '70s of the last century, a mere 25 centuries after the crossbow.
When was a compound crossbow invented?
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  #10  
Old 09-20-2019, 09:08 AM
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DeadEyeGardner DeadEyeGardner is offline
 
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  #11  
Old 09-20-2019, 09:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Passthru View Post
When was a compound crossbow invented?
He owns an Excalibur Micro crossbow. It has recurve limbs (not a compound). I suspect that is where he is coming from
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  #12  
Old 09-20-2019, 09:39 AM
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Positrac Positrac is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Passthru View Post
When was a compound crossbow invented?
Right after the compound bow.

I’ll have layered butter on mine DEG.🙂
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Old 09-20-2019, 10:40 AM
jcrayford jcrayford is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post
You may know already but X-Bow are not legal during archery only season UNLESS you obtain the permit needed to use it with injury or disability. In Alberta a crossbow does not meet the definition of “archery equipment”.

First, to answer the OP. I own a Micro 355. I looked a long time and passed on several offering as they were being discontinued.
The limbs are shorter and therefore a little more effort to cock. The Micro 360 seems to supplant the 355 although I am not sure. Excalibur's warranty is exemplary, I know first hand. Buy a Charger EXT with it if you can afford it.

Crossbows were invented in China during the Zhou dynasty, around the year 700 BC. IMO, if crossbows are to be excluded in archery season, then it stands to reason that compound bows should be excluded too since they were invented in the '70s of the last century, a mere 25 centuries after the crossbow.
It might not be a "date of invention" that is the determining factor as to whether the weapon is to be excluded out of "archery" season, but moreover the "style" of weapon....

In my opinion, I believe that most record book organizations in North America regard archery equipment as being a device "held by muscular power until the time of release". This "held" style of weapon would automatically rule out crossbows as legal archery equipment as once cocked, they can be loaded, ready to shoot for almost eternity.

It all comes back to the fair chase rule, and how Governments have interpreted that rule.

But, for further arguments - see my signature below...

J.
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  #14  
Old 09-20-2019, 11:16 AM
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CanadianEh CanadianEh is offline
 
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Date of invention has nothing to do at all with what is deemed legal or not.

Just like guns, somthings are restricted some aren't.

I believe jcrayford is correct. Likely has to do with one being muscle powered. As every single bow is.

Not saying it is right or wrong. But yes at this point, unless you have a disability which prevents you from drawing a bow, they are illegal to use for hunting during archery season.
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  #15  
Old 09-21-2019, 05:26 PM
Jdunbar Jdunbar is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinnDawg View Post
I’m pretty sure Jim Bows allows xbow on their range.
They do, I think it’s only 1 lane they have for it I could be wrong. But I’ve been there a few times
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  #16  
Old 09-21-2019, 09:30 PM
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Red Bullets Red Bullets is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcrayford View Post
It might not be a "date of invention" that is the determining factor as to whether the weapon is to be excluded out of "archery" season, but moreover the "style" of weapon....

In my opinion, I believe that most record book organizations in North America regard archery equipment as being a device "held by muscular power until the time of release". This "held" style of weapon would automatically rule out crossbows as legal archery equipment as once cocked, they can be loaded, ready to shoot for almost eternity.

It all comes back to the fair chase rule, and how Governments have interpreted that rule.

But, for further arguments - see my signature below...

J.

Not trying to debate. Just an observation.

Held by muscular power could maybe be interpreted in a court of law as the bow itself being held by muscle power. Not the arm pulling back the string but the arm holding the 'hand held' bow.

And it is odd that crossbows are considered cocked but quick triggers with wrist straps aren't. Today's compounds can be held for a long time 'cocked" with a quick trigger too.
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  #17  
Old 09-21-2019, 11:14 PM
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brendan's dad brendan's dad is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Red Bullets View Post
Not trying to debate. Just an observation.

Held by muscular power could maybe be interpreted in a court of law as the bow itself being held by muscle power. Not the arm pulling back the string but the arm holding the 'hand held' bow.

And it is odd that crossbows are considered cocked but quick triggers with wrist straps aren't. Today's compounds can be held for a long time 'cocked" with a quick trigger too.
Why would that be any different then a firearm? I hold up a firearm with "muscle power"

The term "cocked" comes from english roots. English rifles were engraved with pictures of "cocks" for the hammers, so when you readied the firearm you "cocked" it. The French did not want to mimic the english so they engrave dogs on the hammer. The french do not use the term "cock",
they actually used the term "to chien" (dog) a firearm.

So a trad or compound bow is being held in the "cocked" or "chien" position by muscular power where a crossbow or firearm is held in the "cocked" or "chien" position by a mechanical device. That is is the difference.
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  #18  
Old 09-22-2019, 08:50 AM
6.5 shooter 6.5 shooter is offline
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The answer to the question is...The rules where made by politicians..not hunters or target shooters..made by the least qualified to enact on the qualified.
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