Canadaís Outdoor Outfitters Wholesale Sports

Go Back   Alberta Outdoorsmen Forum > Main Category > Hunting Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-29-2019, 02:18 PM
fromhurynout fromhurynout is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 9
Default Alberta Hunting Styles

Hi All,

Iím looking to find out more about the hunting style of successful Alberta hunters.

A bit of backstory, I grew up hunting in SE BC. Given the landscape there, and road hunting aside, itís always been a spot and stalk approach. After moving here and getting a better lay of the area that I hunt, this isnít really possible Ė flat land, dense bush and few clearings.

With little knowledge of the area at the time, I was still able to manage a successful whitetail hunt last year. The areas that I go have lots of sign, and I see animals, but getting a chance at them is a different story.

What Iím wondering, is it best to get out and put some miles on trying to track, or do you set up a stand/blind where you know theyíve been moving and wait?

Again, this is all generally speaking. I know there are different techniques for different areas, different times of the year, etc.

A few details that I may help: rifle hunting, general season, crown land, Clearwater/Mountainview counties.

Any thoughts are appreciated.

Cheers,

Jay
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-29-2019, 03:15 PM
35 whelen's Avatar
35 whelen 35 whelen is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: N.W OF EDMONTON AND EAST OF GRAND PRAIRIE
Posts: 4,564
Default

If you're just talking whitetails my favourite time to hunt whitetails is first couple weeks in November rattling and grunting getting into thickest s*** right with them

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-29-2019, 04:02 PM
kilgoretrout kilgoretrout is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 336
Thumbs up

As with all my hunting I prefer to put the soles to work to get away from the road hunters
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-29-2019, 04:04 PM
3blade's Avatar
3blade 3blade is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,084
Default

Hike until you a find high concentration of feeding sign, get down wind, sit still and be quiet. Same thing over and over and over. Takes about 3 days to kill a deer in a new area.

In some places you can track after a fresh snow, but if thereís too much thick stuff, which is where the deer will go once it knows itís being followed, you wonít get a clean shot.
__________________
DEER!!! No...nope. Hay bale.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-29-2019, 04:10 PM
Big Red 250 Big Red 250 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,763
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3blade View Post
Hike until you a find high concentration of feeding sign, get down wind, sit still and be quiet. Same thing over and over and over. Takes about 3 days to kill a deer in a new area.

In some places you can track after a fresh snow, but if thereís too much thick stuff, which is where the deer will go once it knows itís being followed, you wonít get a clean shot.
Same as this post, but when your hiking, slow down your pace and look behind yourself frequently.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-29-2019, 04:14 PM
Zuludog's Avatar
Zuludog Zuludog is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Beaumont
Posts: 3,304
Default

Definitely always keep checking behind you. WT deer are very sneaky and more than once have caught them crossing my trail behind me.
__________________
The kill is the satisfying, indeed essential, conclusion to a successful hunt. But, I take no pleasure in the act itself. One does not hunt in order to kill, but kills in order to have hunted. Then why do I hunt? I hunt for the same reason my well-fed cat hunts...because I must, because it is in the blood, because I am the decendent of a thousand generations of hunters. I hunt because I am a hunter.- Finn Aagard
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-29-2019, 05:32 PM
Redhorse Ranch Redhorse Ranch is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Beaver County
Posts: 73
Default Hunting styles

I'm a dedicated stump-sitter; my wife and son also. There's something about becoming part of the landscape that is really attractive to me. You get to see the darndest things. And a lot of really big unconcerned deer.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-29-2019, 06:13 PM
catnthehat's Avatar
catnthehat catnthehat is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Ft. McMurray
Posts: 34,983
Default

I am primarily a still hunter more than a spot and stalk guy except when I hunt the river, then it's spot and stalk.
However the field I took my white tail buck out of this year would be almost impossible too still hunt, simply because of the surrounding bush and big open field.
We formulated a plan, set up a blind in the middle of the day and waited for them to come in the evening.
Cat
__________________
" And then there's Neil Young- I'm certain there's a few loose strings on THAT guitar!"
Rex Murphy
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-29-2019, 06:36 PM
Jim Jim is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 228
Default Hunting

From what I have observed the majority of hunting is done by driving around in the truck. See deer in farmers field, drive into field shoot deer and youíre done.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-29-2019, 06:44 PM
Bush Critter Bush Critter is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 199
Default

Hey there is nothing wrong with the road hunters!!! At least I know where they are... 😉
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-29-2019, 06:55 PM
wildwoods's Avatar
wildwoods wildwoods is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Location
Posts: 4,172
Default

I think the best answer is to hunt how the situation demands.
My go to options usually include:
Iím not going to sit in my favourite bear area. Iím gonna wear off my rhino tires spotting and stalking. On the flip side, I have patterned elk to where Iíll sit tight to intercept between food and bed. Moose (when not rutting)for me (varies by the time of year too) is more of a still hunt (i.e.- walking very slowly and glassing like crazy to catch them before they catch you). Sheep is a sit and glass game and trying to stay mentally sharp. Antelope is a glass and manoeuvre game. Whitetail I usually find myself calling from a tree or ground blind. Wind is a huge factor in most of these as well.


There is really no best way to hunt ďAlbertaĒ. You hunt the best way to find success. To find success you need to learn habitat and what the game is doing in that particular area. Those lessons learned from hunting one area can usually be applied to other areas. Itís a maturing, learning process. The very best part of hunting in my opinion- unlocking secrets as you go to add to your arsenal of approach/ methods.

Above is listed the ways I will usually approach it. But I would have to say nearly every species requires you to be proficient in all forms and methods. The guys on this forum who successfully kill not just what theyíre after, but big animals consistently will most likely agree that you need to adapt to the situation and employ a big bag of tricks.

My $.02
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-29-2019, 08:27 PM
burnme burnme is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 147
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwoods View Post
I think the best answer is to hunt how the situation demands.
My go to options usually include:
Iím not going to sit in my favourite bear area. Iím gonna wear off my rhino tires spotting and stalking. On the flip side, I have patterned elk to where Iíll sit tight to intercept between food and bed. Moose (when not rutting)for me (varies by the time of year too) is more of a still hunt (i.e.- walking very slowly and glassing like crazy to catch them before they catch you). Sheep is a sit and glass game and trying to stay mentally sharp. Antelope is a glass and manoeuvre game. Whitetail I usually find myself calling from a tree or ground blind. Wind is a huge factor in most of these as well.


There is really no best way to hunt ďAlbertaĒ. You hunt the best way to find success. To find success you need to learn habitat and what the game is doing in that particular area. Those lessons learned from hunting one area can usually be applied to other areas. Itís a maturing, learning process. The very best part of hunting in my opinion- unlocking secrets as you go to add to your arsenal of approach/ methods.

Above is listed the ways I will usually approach it. But I would have to say nearly every species requires you to be proficient in all forms and methods. The guys on this forum who successfully kill not just what theyíre after, but big animals consistently will most likely agree that you need to adapt to the situation and employ a big bag of tricks.

My $.02
Well put

And having a little luck!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-29-2019, 11:22 PM
Bushleague Bushleague is offline
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,571
Default

Pretty much any style of hunting will work in AB, given half appropriate terrain. Personally I like to track or still hunt in big timber, simply because I rarely have to compete with other hunters, and because I enjoy it the most. I rarely spend a day wandering the game trails and looking at sign where I don't learn something interesting and useful, which I can not say of hunting a stand. Required gear is extremely minimal, and most of what you need to know can only be learned by covering ground and looking at tracks.
__________________
There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-30-2019, 12:27 AM
thumper's Avatar
thumper thumper is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Canmore
Posts: 3,875
Default

A very successful method for me, that I haven't seen mentioned yet is AMBUSH. In more open country, feeding animals often slowly 'drift' in a pretty consistent direction. Instead of trying to stalk them where they're at, be very still and wait until they're out of sight, and then stalk to where they're going to be.
I find that gives me lots of time to settle in, get comfortable and my breathing under control and then as the target comes into view I can take a good, clean, unhurried shot on an unsuspecting animal.
__________________
The world is changed by your action, not by your opinion.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-30-2019, 11:37 AM
Bushleague Bushleague is offline
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,571
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thumper View Post
A very successful method for me, that I haven't seen mentioned yet is AMBUSH. In more open country, feeding animals often slowly 'drift' in a pretty consistent direction. Instead of trying to stalk them where they're at, be very still and wait until they're out of sight, and then stalk to where they're going to be.
I find that gives me lots of time to settle in, get comfortable and my breathing under control and then as the target comes into view I can take a good, clean, unhurried shot on an unsuspecting animal.
I guess I would lump this in with spot and stalk, but I agree with you. Getting ahead of a moving animal is often a more successful strategy than trying to stalk a stationary one, albeit less precise and depending a little more on guesswork. I'm generally pretty comfortable with a fair degree of guesswork though, and all the benefits you listed are entirely true.

This can work in fairly dense country too when the variables are right, of course getting the guesswork right becomes more critical.
__________________
There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-30-2019, 03:21 PM
thumper's Avatar
thumper thumper is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Canmore
Posts: 3,875
Default

Another successful strategy for me, is not to be afraid to HUNT SOLO. With no pressure on meeting a partner at a specific time back at the truck, or worrying about straying into their hunting zone and screwing up their hunt, or fiddling with 2-way radios, I find solo hunts much more relaxing. I'm able to follow my own intuitions/instincts, take my time and focus on the task at hand. When it's time for the shot, it's almost always a well placed shot, on a standing, relaxed animal - not a rushed shot at an animal being 'pushed' by others.

On the down-side, I now have health issues that I need to consider and so I miss out on hunting the late afternoon/early evening 'golden hour', because I don't want to be cleaning game and dragging it out well after dark by myself. After 2 or 3 in the afternoon, I usually quit actively hunting and poke around formulating a plan for the following day. With a partner, or a group, I might be more aggressive in hunting later in the day.

Also, there's the social aspect of hunting with others that I sometimes miss - sometimes not.

But on the whole, I'm much more effective in taking animals, while hunting solo.
__________________
The world is changed by your action, not by your opinion.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-30-2019, 03:49 PM
trigger7mm trigger7mm is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,724
Default Alberta hunting style

From what Iíve seen in my home area, the majority of guys hunt the same way. Drive around the roads and fields before daylight, and after dark with the gun on the seat, and when something is spotted, stick it out the window and blaze away.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-30-2019, 04:24 PM
alpineguy's Avatar
alpineguy alpineguy is online now
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Olds, Sundre area Alberta
Posts: 1,986
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by trigger7mm View Post
From what Iíve seen in my home area, the majority of guys hunt the same way. Drive around the roads and fields before daylight, and after dark with the gun on the seat, and when something is spotted, stick it out the window and blaze away.
That might be called Poaching......not hunting!!!
__________________
Horizon Parent Society (Helping kids with disabilities)
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-30-2019, 05:13 PM
trigger7mm trigger7mm is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,724
Default Alberta hunting style

Quote:
Originally Posted by alpineguy View Post
That might be called Poaching......not hunting!!!
Exactly, way too much of it going on. Deer killers, not deer hunters.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-01-2019, 12:44 PM
Joe Black Joe Black is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 992
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by trigger7mm View Post
From what Iíve seen in my home area, the majority of guys hunt the same way. Drive around the roads and fields before daylight, and after dark with the gun on the seat, and when something is spotted, stick it out the window and blaze away.
And if you have a quad in the back of the truck, you can ride on it in the back of the truck and shoot from it.

That way you keep all of those that Think everyone in a truck, or on a quad, is a poacher, happy.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 12-01-2019, 12:59 PM
Skoaltender's Avatar
Skoaltender Skoaltender is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Alberta
Posts: 967
Default

One of the most common tactics in Alberta is to just drive the range roads, littering it with beer cans, shooting from the roads or your vehicles. If youíre not seeing anything you can always drive onto a farmers field, which you probably have no permission, driving the field edges while honking your horn every 15 seconds hoping to spook out the big one.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-01-2019, 01:12 PM
Joe Black Joe Black is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 992
Default

And on horses. Ride around all day and shoot off your horse. Make sure you give the horse a beer or two during the day.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-01-2019, 01:15 PM
Joe Black Joe Black is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 992
Default

To keep them hydrated I mean
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-01-2019, 01:37 PM
Skoaltender's Avatar
Skoaltender Skoaltender is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Alberta
Posts: 967
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post
And on horses. Ride around all day and shoot off your horse. Make sure you give the horse a beer or two during the day.
Donít forget to cut the lock to the gate and leave it open so all the other livestock get loose.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-01-2019, 02:58 PM
Joe Black Joe Black is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 992
Default

Wouldn't happen if you didn't out a wire gate there to begin with.

Show a little consideration. Install a Texas gate.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-01-2019, 03:11 PM
last minute last minute is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,922
Default are you sure!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim View Post
From what I have observed the majority of hunting is done by driving around in the truck. See deer in farmers field, drive into field shoot deer and youíre done.
WOW is that how its done Thanks for that.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-01-2019, 04:07 PM
Joe Black Joe Black is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 992
Default

Yes, you may have been doing it wrong to this point.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-01-2019, 04:13 PM
last minute last minute is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,922
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post
Yes, you may have been doing it wrong to this point.
i am guessing the next step is buying a pool noodle that would be in order
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12-02-2019, 09:26 AM
Big Grey Wolf Big Grey Wolf is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,036
Default Hunting Alberta

Wildwoods, excellent post, you have described a "Real Alberta Hunter" Some of the other posts only describe ' Shooters". Well done! Each animal requires a specific technique to be successful.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-02-2019, 10:12 AM
DiabeticKripple's Avatar
DiabeticKripple DiabeticKripple is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Blackfalds
Posts: 5,722
Default

i usually go to a spot i know holds deer from my trail cams (apparently thats another topic on here...) in the morning and get out and slowly walk cutlines and game trails. later in the morning if i havent got anything i start driving. Looking for deer and grouse. Afternoon rolls around and i go back to walking until last night. Last hour of hunting time i settle down on a cutline about 200yds from game trails and wait for something to cross.
__________________
Trudeau sits to pee
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
hunting, white tail

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.