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Old 01-17-2020, 03:47 AM
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ayman76 ayman76 is offline
 
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Default Are rifle cases interchangeable?

Hello, I am trying to get into reloading of my 30-06 sprg 180 gr cases, the factory ammo was Federal power shok 30-06 180 gr SP so my question is, can I use these federal cases and reload them with Barnes VOR-TX 30-06 sprg 180 gr Tipped TSX bullet type ?????

Are rifle cases interchangeable? If not why ?

Thanks for your input everyone.


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Old 01-17-2020, 04:14 AM
colroggal colroggal is offline
 
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The 30-06 uses a .308 bullet. Same as the .308 winchester, the .300 winchester magnum and countless others. You can use your cases to load pretty much any brand and weight of .308 bullets you want.

I suggest investing a few hours on YouTube and picking up a few basic books on the subject. The ABC's of Reloading is a good one.

Colin
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Old 01-17-2020, 06:48 AM
obsessed1 obsessed1 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ayman76 View Post
Hello, I am trying to get into reloading of my 30-06 sprg 180 gr cases, the factory ammo was Federal power shok 30-06 180 gr SP so my question is, can I use these federal cases and reload them with Barnes VOR-TX 30-06 sprg 180 gr Tipped TSX bullet type ?????

Are rifle cases interchangeable? If not why ?

Thanks for your input everyone.


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Short answer is yes. Long answer is get at least three reloading books / manuals and read them. It's a good idea to find a mentor to show you and work with you the first few times. Reloading is easy enough a 10 year old could probably do it but there is a certain amount of knowledge needed to do it safely. Not being rude but if you put handloading knowledge on a scale from one to one hundred, based on your your question you would be a 6-8. It's not a SLIGHT at all it's actually a good thing. you just don't want to jump right in building ammo without learning a bit more first. Accidents are real and can be life changing.
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Old 01-17-2020, 07:37 AM
saskbooknut saskbooknut is offline
 
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You need to be aware that interior volume is not the same between different brands of rifle brass.
Which is one fundamental reason to start low and work up reloads.
Perhaps more reading about reloading principles is in order.
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Old 01-17-2020, 08:30 AM
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waldedw waldedw is offline
 
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There are a number of reloading courses available, my advise enroll in a course, pay attention and go slowly from there, the $150 fee for the course will be well worth it and may save you big time in the end
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Old 01-17-2020, 08:37 AM
elkhunter11 elkhunter11 is offline
 
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You can use one brand bullet in another brand case, but once you have a load do not substitute components without working up the load again.
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Old 01-17-2020, 09:24 AM
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Mixing and matching cases is not a recipe for success while reloading. Different manufacture cases have different internal volumes, which will alter how a given load performs.

Id suggest you buy and read a couple different loading manuals(the how to chapters) I like Speer for the how to sections, and something like Sierra or Hornady for general information.
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Old 01-17-2020, 12:00 PM
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ayman76 ayman76 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colroggal View Post
The 30-06 uses a .308 bullet. Same as the .308 winchester, the .300 winchester magnum and countless others. You can use your cases to load pretty much any brand and weight of .308 bullets you want.



I suggest investing a few hours on YouTube and picking up a few basic books on the subject. The ABC's of Reloading is a good one.



Colin


Thank you indeed

Cheers


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Old 01-17-2020, 12:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colroggal View Post
The 30-06 uses a .308 bullet. Same as the .308 winchester, the .300 winchester magnum and countless others. You can use your cases to load pretty much any brand and weight of .308 bullets you want.

I suggest investing a few hours on YouTube and picking up a few basic books on the subject. The ABC's of Reloading is a good one.

Colin
x5. If you are asking these kinds of questions you need to do a lot more studying. A number of places offer reloading courses, depending on hwere you are located.It would also help if you can find a mentor to help you learn. Reloading is not something you want to do without fully understanding how things work. Best of luck.

Edit P.S. Sorry missed Obssesed's answer. He said same thing. Didn't intend to pile on.

Last edited by Dean2; 01-17-2020 at 12:28 PM.
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Old 01-17-2020, 12:19 PM
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ayman76 ayman76 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by obsessed1 View Post
Short answer is yes. Long answer is get at least three reloading books / manuals and read them. It's a good idea to find a mentor to show you and work with you the first few times. Reloading is easy enough a 10 year old could probably do it but there is a certain amount of knowledge needed to do it safely. Not being rude but if you put handloading knowledge on a scale from one to one hundred, based on your your question you would be a 6-8. It's not a SLIGHT at all it's actually a good thing. you just don't want to jump right in building ammo without learning a bit more first. Accidents are real and can be life changing.


You bet and i do put safety first , so having said that I need to be precaution before getting into reloading is actually an appreciated answer, thank you man.

My other question is this : a lot of reloading manual including Lyman 48th, Hornady 10th revision, Nosler, etc dont mention all the bullets types in the market and their powder amount needed for a specific velocity. So for instance I am trying to reload my Federal power shok 30-06 180 gr SP with Federal Premium Vital Shok Ammunition - 180 grain Trophy Bonded Tip bullets, and Lyman 48th Manuel does not mention any Federal ammunition that are tested for the 30-06 cartridge. So where do I get the data sheet for that specific bullet type and cartridge name??? Do you have the Lyman 50th edition book ? I could not find it PDF online .

Thank you indeed for your assistance, much appreciated.

Cheers


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Old 01-17-2020, 12:38 PM
Subaru297 Subaru297 is offline
 
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The Federal website has information on the 180gr trophy bonded tip along with seven different powders.

https://www.federalpremium.com/reloa...ing-rifle.html

You should compare this with at least one or two of your manuals to make sure it looks accurate. You can compare to another 180gr bullet using the same powder that you plan to use.

Always start with the minimum charge weight.
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Old 01-17-2020, 02:06 PM
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urban rednek urban rednek is offline
 
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Post Speer reloading data

The Federal Vital Shock 180gr. Trophy Bonded Tip ammunition is loaded with the proprietary Speer 180gr TBBC SP (Trophy Bonded Bear Claw) bullet. The Speer Reloading Manual #14 has load data for this bullet in a 30.06 for the following powders: IMR 7828, H4350, Reloder 22, H4831SC, IMR 4350, Viht. N540, & 760.
In the notes, it indicates that magnum primers were used with the 760 powder.
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Old 01-17-2020, 02:22 PM
obsessed1 obsessed1 is offline
 
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Default Bullets

Forget trying to compare federal vital shok with federal power shok what matters is the individual components are what matters.
Case: All manufacturers cases are made of different thicknesses/ hardness. Occurring during the drawing process of the brass. Each case mfr will give different pressure spikes based on these differences.
Primer: each primer mfr uses a slightly different compound so they give hotter or longer ignition. Note there are std and mag which will further change ignition temp.
Powder: each powder has a unique burn rate and must be measured precisely keeping within the verified data for the cartridge and each bullet weight within that same cartridge.
Bullet: each bullet has varying length/ shape / weight. Bearing surface and jacket material is crucial info for safe loads.
Seating depth plays a role in pressure as does neck tension.
Generally speaking two type develop load manuals. Powder mfr and bullet mfr. ( it's good practice to compare 3-4 manuals for discrepancies)if you want a specific brand of bullet start with that mfr load data. Obviously hornady will not have data using a Nosler bullet and so on.
Simple way to describe it is
Choose your bullet. Then Find load data for that bullet or one that is very similar
Choose your powder and primer type based on the data found.
Start on the low end of the powder charge weight and load 3-5 rounds with each charge weight from light to heavy. Shoot those rounds looking for pressure signs and so on.
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Old 01-17-2020, 04:01 PM
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ayman76 ayman76 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Subaru297 View Post
The Federal website has information on the 180gr trophy bonded tip along with seven different powders.



https://www.federalpremium.com/reloa...ing-rifle.html



You should compare this with at least one or two of your manuals to make sure it looks accurate. You can compare to another 180gr bullet using the same powder that you plan to use.



Always start with the minimum charge weight.


Thanks dude

Cheers


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  #15  
Old 01-17-2020, 04:50 PM
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ayman76 ayman76 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by obsessed1 View Post
Forget trying to compare federal vital shok with federal power shok what matters is the individual components are what matters.

Case: All manufacturers cases are made of different thicknesses/ hardness. Occurring during the drawing process of the brass. Each case mfr will give different pressure spikes based on these differences.

Primer: each primer mfr uses a slightly different compound so they give hotter or longer ignition. Note there are std and mag which will further change ignition temp.

Powder: each powder has a unique burn rate and must be measured precisely keeping within the verified data for the cartridge and each bullet weight within that same cartridge.

Bullet: each bullet has varying length/ shape / weight. Bearing surface and jacket material is crucial info for safe loads.

Seating depth plays a role in pressure as does neck tension.

Generally speaking two type develop load manuals. Powder mfr and bullet mfr. ( it's good practice to compare 3-4 manuals for discrepancies)if you want a specific brand of bullet start with that mfr load data. Obviously hornady will not have data using a Nosler bullet and so on.

Simple way to describe it is

Choose your bullet. Then Find load data for that bullet or one that is very similar

Choose your powder and primer type based on the data found.

Start on the low end of the powder charge weight and load 3-5 rounds with each charge weight from light to heavy. Shoot those rounds looking for pressure signs and so on.


Not comparing cartridges, for sure they have different pressure output and powder type and bullets. But all good now.

Cheers


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  #16  
Old 01-17-2020, 05:04 PM
obsessed1 obsessed1 is offline
 
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[QUOTE=ayman76;4094157]
So for instance I am trying to reload my Federal power shok 30-06 180 gr SP with Federal Premium Vital Shok Ammunition - 180 grain Trophy Bonded Tip bullets.

Cheers
This is the sentence I was commenting on. Glad you got out figured out
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