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  #1  
Old 06-13-2024, 06:02 AM
radubc radubc is offline
 
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Default McGregor Lake, wind and waves

I’m new to McGregor fishing and boating and I’m trying to figure out if I can fish from my boat when winds are high. I noticed that the winds are usually around 30 km/h gusting to 40 and sometimes 50 km/h. How are the waves in these winds, and how would they affect a small 16ft aluminum boat? Would they be acceptable for kids?
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  #2  
Old 06-13-2024, 07:06 AM
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It would be a dangerous decision.
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  #3  
Old 06-13-2024, 08:49 AM
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I would not do 50k. I will go not out with my grandkids if gusts are forecast above 30k. If I go with friends I will tolerate up to 50k gusts, but honestly it is not much fun then. My boat is also a small 16ft as well. Bigger lakes are more dangerous obviously.
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  #4  
Old 06-13-2024, 09:01 AM
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There comes a point when the wind makes fishing more like work than fun. For me, the wind speeds you are talking about are anything but fun.

I've been on McGregor a few times when Windy and the Weather Network completely missed the mark. The trip back to the launch was stressful to say the least. And, the launch is open to the lake, so depending on the wind direction and wind speed, loading your boat can be interesting. ( Wind out of the south would be the worst, imo )

IMO, McGregor is one of the most dangerous lakes in the province. You would not catch me on that lake if high wind speeds were in the forecast, especially with kids.
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  #5  
Old 06-13-2024, 12:12 PM
Macdrizzle Macdrizzle is offline
 
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in my experience anything over 35km/h gusting will lead to white caps. I don't fish in whitecaps but to each their own.

With that being said the wind has been horrible for the past 2 weeks so I understand your itch.
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  #6  
Old 06-13-2024, 02:53 PM
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Danger Will Robinson!

I had a experience with a tinner and wind as a kid. I was out on a lake in the Koots in a similar tinner and a storm blew in. I was headed back to the wharf and a gust blew me sideways. Shortly after I straightened it back out I went over a whitecap and the wind blew to boat over top of me. I managed to jump out but not without taking a good wallop on the back from the boat. Luckily there are lots of shore residents at that lake and a neighbour saw it happen and came out to rescue me.Yes, I was wearing my life jacket or wouldn't be telling this story. Lost all my gear. The boat was recovered and ran for many more years. That boat had been to the bottom of the lake many times by my dad and uncle.

Ever since then I avoid the lake when there are white caps. Tinners are light and vulnerable to the wind.
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Old 06-13-2024, 09:56 PM
radubc radubc is offline
 
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Got it. Thanks for the answers.
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  #8  
Old 06-16-2024, 06:17 PM
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IMO, McGregor is one of the most dangerous lakes in the province. You would not catch me on that lake if high wind speeds were in the forecast, especially with kids.


X2 I live just off the lake. It is not one to mess with for sure.
Weather comes in faster than you think. Especially the W
Many people have drowned here.Better safe than sorry IMO
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  #9  
Old 06-16-2024, 07:22 PM
deschambault deschambault is offline
 
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I didn't know of drownings in McGregor but do know of them in both Newell and Crawling Valley. There is no reason to be on a large southern reservoir when the wind comes up. It's no fun fishing anyway and it's not worth your life.
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  #10  
Old 06-16-2024, 09:51 PM
JD848 JD848 is online now
 
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The winds have been bad all across the country ,mother nature rules and we need to obey her and pay attention .

Don't mess around ,think about it .Water can become a nightmare very fast .
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  #11  
Old 06-17-2024, 11:31 AM
TROLLER TROLLER is offline
 
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There was an article in the Calgary Herald that claimed McGregor has been invested with the muscles we all are trying to keep out of our lakes.

Any one else hear anything about that. Sure was news to me
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  #12  
Old 06-17-2024, 12:19 PM
elkhunter11 elkhunter11 is offline
 
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I don't launch my boat anywhere, in winds above 30km/hr, it's too rough to travel to where we fish, and tougher to get it back on the trailer with a crosswind that high.
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  #13  
Old 06-17-2024, 12:24 PM
Team Beef Team Beef is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TROLLER View Post
There was an article in the Calgary Herald that claimed McGregor has been invested with the muscles we all are trying to keep out of our lakes.

Any one else hear anything about that. Sure was news to me
Re read the article!

This was an estimate of possible costs if the Mussels were found to be in Mcgregor. Please read the report below.
WE all need to be aware of how easy these mussels can be introduced.


Fines associated with avoiding boat inspections in Alberta will increase by thousands starting June 20.

Scott Hayes, Local Journalism Initiative ReporterJun 12, 2024 2:55 PM
epa-zebra-mussels-inspection-20240612-02
Alberta officials inspect incoming boats for invasive species.Government of Alberta
Starting next Thursday, Alberta will raise the fines related to aquatic invasive species to become the highest in all of North America.

The fines for failing to stop with a trailered boat at an open inspection station will jump from $324 to $4,200. For those that fail to remove a bilge plug when transporting a watercraft on a roadway, the fines will rise from $180 to $600.

“Zebra mussels and other invasive species can devastate Alberta’s rivers, lakes and waterways,” said Minister of Environment and Protected Areas Rebecca Schulz in a Wednesday news release.

“We are setting the highest fines in North America because we want everyone to take inspection and detection seriously. Alberta is currently zebra and quagga mussel free so let’s keep’em out.”

The stringent measures are meant to help ensure that zebra mussels and other aquatic invasive species stay out of Alberta’s waters.

Currently, Alberta is zebra and quagga mussel free, but they can easily spread through boats and other watercraft that cross borders. If they become established in Alberta, then aquatic invasive species can spread rapidly and cause damage every step of the way. They clog waterways and infrastructure, harm ecosystems and cause hundreds of millions in damages to lakes, waterways and irrigation infrastructure.

There have not been any reports of aquatic invasive species in Jasper National Park. This year, the local aquatic invasive species prevention program will bring in additional measures to better protect the waters of Jasper National Park. There will be a main inspection station located on the Maligne Lake Road plus an additional station located at Whistlers Campground.

The roving public education team will also have an increased presence at area water bodies throughout the park, educating and talking with visitors about the importance of the “clean, drain, dry” proactive steps.

Parks Canada, however, recently closed all bodies of water in British Columbia's Kootenay and Yoho national parks and restricted watercraft in Waterton Lakes National Park to slow the spread of invasive species.

Whirling Disease was discovered in Banff National Park several years ago, and it has also spread to Yoho and Kootenay National Parks in British Columbia.

Around the country and the continent, reports of aquatic invasive species are increasing.

The province stated that it must do everything that it can to prevent damage from aquatic invasive species. A recent study estimated that introducing invasive mussels into just Lake McGregor southeast of Calgary could cost $284 million a year in damages. That water body is part of a larger interconnected system that includes reservoirs and irrigation infrastructure in southern Alberta.

All it takes is just one boat with one zebra mussel to start the chain of destruction. So far, inspections have been successful.

“Every year, boat inspection stations identify several boats entering Alberta contaminated with invasive mussels,” said Megan Evans, executive director of the Alberta Invasive Species Council, in the news release.

“Increasing fines for failing to stop with a trailered boat at an inspection station will help ensure that all boats coming into Alberta are inspected and mussel-free. Prevention is the most effective way to prevent mussels from establishing and destructively impacting Alberta’s waterbodies.”

The only way to stop the spread is to follow the “clean, drain, dry” routine: make sure that your watercraft is dry for at least 48 hours (or at least 30 days after use in the United States or provinces other than British Columbia, Alberta and the territories). This is because some aquatic invasive species (such as zebra and quagga mussels) can survive for nearly 30 days out of water.

The Alberta government has also launched a new Aquatic Invasive Species Task Force and invested $2.5 million to increase the number of inspection stations, add more inspectors, and keep stations open as long as possible.

Aquatic Invasive Species Task Force chair Grant Hunter reminded everyone that watercraft inspections have been mandatory in Alberta since 2015, and that fines are in place to help ensure that boaters follow the rules.

Last year alone, the province inspected 8,818 boats. Of those, 19 were confirmed positive for invasive mussels and two of them came into Canada from the United States. Final destinations of those 19 included seven stops in Alberta.

“The best way to prevent invasive species from getting established is for all people coming into the province to do their part by making sure their drain plug is removed and stopping at inspection stations,” said Grant Hunter, chair of the Invasive Species Task Force and MLA for Taber-Warner, in the news release.

The government has also launched a new Aquatic Invasive Species Task Force and invested $2.5 million to increase the number of inspection stations, add more inspectors, and keep stations open as long as possible.
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  #14  
Old 06-18-2024, 09:03 AM
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fish99 fish99 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Team Beef View Post
Re read the article!

This was an estimate of possible costs if the Mussels were found to be in Mcgregor. Please read the report below.
WE all need to be aware of how easy these mussels can be introduced.


Fines associated with avoiding boat inspections in Alberta will increase by thousands starting June 20.

Scott Hayes, Local Journalism Initiative ReporterJun 12, 2024 2:55 PM
epa-zebra-mussels-inspection-20240612-02
Alberta officials inspect incoming boats for invasive species.Government of Alberta
Starting next Thursday, Alberta will raise the fines related to aquatic invasive species to become the highest in all of North America.

The fines for failing to stop with a trailered boat at an open inspection station will jump from $324 to $4,200. For those that fail to remove a bilge plug when transporting a watercraft on a roadway, the fines will rise from $180 to $600.

“Zebra mussels and other invasive species can devastate Alberta’s rivers, lakes and waterways,” said Minister of Environment and Protected Areas Rebecca Schulz in a Wednesday news release.

“We are setting the highest fines in North America because we want everyone to take inspection and detection seriously. Alberta is currently zebra and quagga mussel free so let’s keep’em out.”

The stringent measures are meant to help ensure that zebra mussels and other aquatic invasive species stay out of Alberta’s waters.

Currently, Alberta is zebra and quagga mussel free, but they can easily spread through boats and other watercraft that cross borders. If they become established in Alberta, then aquatic invasive species can spread rapidly and cause damage every step of the way. They clog waterways and infrastructure, harm ecosystems and cause hundreds of millions in damages to lakes, waterways and irrigation infrastructure.

There have not been any reports of aquatic invasive species in Jasper National Park. This year, the local aquatic invasive species prevention program will bring in additional measures to better protect the waters of Jasper National Park. There will be a main inspection station located on the Maligne Lake Road plus an additional station located at Whistlers Campground.

The roving public education team will also have an increased presence at area water bodies throughout the park, educating and talking with visitors about the importance of the “clean, drain, dry” proactive steps.

Parks Canada, however, recently closed all bodies of water in British Columbia's Kootenay and Yoho national parks and restricted watercraft in Waterton Lakes National Park to slow the spread of invasive species.

Whirling Disease was discovered in Banff National Park several years ago, and it has also spread to Yoho and Kootenay National Parks in British Columbia.

Around the country and the continent, reports of aquatic invasive species are increasing.

The province stated that it must do everything that it can to prevent damage from aquatic invasive species. A recent study estimated that introducing invasive mussels into just Lake McGregor southeast of Calgary could cost $284 million a year in damages. That water body is part of a larger interconnected system that includes reservoirs and irrigation infrastructure in southern Alberta.

All it takes is just one boat with one zebra mussel to start the chain of destruction. So far, inspections have been successful.

“Every year, boat inspection stations identify several boats entering Alberta contaminated with invasive mussels,” said Megan Evans, executive director of the Alberta Invasive Species Council, in the news release.

“Increasing fines for failing to stop with a trailered boat at an inspection station will help ensure that all boats coming into Alberta are inspected and mussel-free. Prevention is the most effective way to prevent mussels from establishing and destructively impacting Alberta’s waterbodies.”

The only way to stop the spread is to follow the “clean, drain, dry” routine: make sure that your watercraft is dry for at least 48 hours (or at least 30 days after use in the United States or provinces other than British Columbia, Alberta and the territories). This is because some aquatic invasive species (such as zebra and quagga mussels) can survive for nearly 30 days out of water.

The Alberta government has also launched a new Aquatic Invasive Species Task Force and invested $2.5 million to increase the number of inspection stations, add more inspectors, and keep stations open as long as possible.

Aquatic Invasive Species Task Force chair Grant Hunter reminded everyone that watercraft inspections have been mandatory in Alberta since 2015, and that fines are in place to help ensure that boaters follow the rules.

Last year alone, the province inspected 8,818 boats. Of those, 19 were confirmed positive for invasive mussels and two of them came into Canada from the United States. Final destinations of those 19 included seven stops in Alberta.

“The best way to prevent invasive species from getting established is for all people coming into the province to do their part by making sure their drain plug is removed and stopping at inspection stations,” said Grant Hunter, chair of the Invasive Species Task Force and MLA for Taber-Warner, in the news release.

The government has also launched a new Aquatic Invasive Species Task Force and invested $2.5 million to increase the number of inspection stations, add more inspectors, and keep stations open as long as possible.
in may we went to Vancouver island with the boat and was inspected at golden for invasive species, we were so disappointed on our return trip on the trans Canada hi way that there was not a inspection station open on our way to Calgary . middle of the day it was closed and had no signs of being open this year. this is how its going to spread , we cannot let our guard down ever. increasing fines are not going to work if there is not one checking boats.
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  #15  
Old 06-18-2024, 07:07 PM
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ORV ORV is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TROLLER View Post
There was an article in the Calgary Herald that claimed McGregor has been invested with the muscles we all are trying to keep out of our lakes.

Any one else hear anything about that. Sure was news to me
Was answered above. we have another invasive species here to contend with
Crayfish or Crawdads if you will. I think they came up from Travers a few years
ago.
South end where i am is lousy with them. not sure if they made their way to milo end yet.????

Orv
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  #16  
Old 06-18-2024, 07:30 PM
chucklesthe3rd chucklesthe3rd is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ORV View Post
Was answered above. we have another invasive species here to contend with
Crayfish or Crawdads if you will. I think they came up from Travers a few years
ago.
South end where i am is lousy with them. not sure if they made their way to milo end yet.????

Orv
They've been in our southern reservoirs for quite some time now. The crayfish definitely traveled into McGregor some other way than travers since it doesn't seem very likely that the crayfish could scale a spillway of that size and then another one right below travers dam. As for the wind topic, I would just fish from shore if the winds came up. At McGregor the south end shoreline is quite steep so as a shore fisherman you can access deeper water quite easily.
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  #17  
Old 06-18-2024, 09:00 PM
deschambault deschambault is offline
 
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Newell has had crawfish for years and they are thick in Travers, kids catch pails of them off the docks at the PP. I haven't seen them at CV and don't know about McGregor.
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  #18  
Old 06-18-2024, 09:09 PM
Wes_G Wes_G is offline
 
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All kinds of crayfish in the Oldman river. Was down sturgeon fishing one night and they were everywhere. I grabbed one and it had all its eggs under its tail
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  #19  
Old 06-19-2024, 09:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ORV View Post
Was answered above. we have another invasive species here to contend with
Crayfish or Crawdads if you will. I think they came up from Travers a few years
ago.
South end where i am is lousy with them. not sure if they made their way to milo end yet.????

Orv
Tons of them on both ends of the lake for numerous years already. You drop minnow down and in 1 min there will be 2-3 of them fighting for it. Quite entertaining to watch on camera when bite is slow. Burbot bellies usually are full of them but they can't keep up cleaning them up as it seems.
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  #20  
Old 06-19-2024, 09:51 AM
oilngas oilngas is offline
 
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Crawling has crawfish
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