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Old 01-07-2017, 05:20 AM
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Default 1285 Fox

I thought some of you might find this intersting.

Some of you may have seen this on facebook, for those who haven't, how's this for a seasons catch?




I love the last comment.
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Old 01-07-2017, 06:36 AM
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Thats a busy busy man too bad they dont fetch a good price auction ..thanx for sharing keg
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Old 01-07-2017, 07:13 AM
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Quite a picture ,a lot of work and time in getting them. Im betting Martys barn pic of coyotes beats this guys paycheck by a long ways .
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Old 01-07-2017, 10:08 AM
Big Grey Wolf Big Grey Wolf is offline
 
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That guy sure goes hard, would be interesting to know some of his fox trapping technique. Now I know why we get such poor prices for our fox.
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Old 01-07-2017, 10:10 AM
Tfng Tfng is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Big Grey Wolf View Post
That guy sure goes hard, would be interesting to know some of his fox trapping technique. Now I know why we get such poor prices for our fox.
He posts a bit over on Trapperman.
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  #6  
Old 01-07-2017, 10:23 AM
waterninja waterninja is online now
 
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1285 in one year? On a 100 mile trapline? That is unbelievable. WOW is right. you wouldn't think there could be that many foxes in that amount of area. What an awesome pic.
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Old 01-08-2017, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by waterninja View Post
1285 in one year? On a 100 mile trapline? That is unbelievable. WOW is right. you wouldn't think there could be that many foxes in that amount of area. What an awesome pic.
I wonder if there are even that many Fox in all of Alberta.

It's not like I see one or more every day. If I see one a month I've seen a lot for that month.
And the tracks suggest I'm seeing all there is out there.
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The railroad cars can go.
I'm not allowed to shoot off steam,
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And see who catches Hell!
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Old 01-09-2017, 08:12 AM
Big Grey Wolf Big Grey Wolf is offline
 
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Keg, your Northern area probably has high wolf and coyote numbers. My guess is they are keeping the fox numbers in check. The Parkland areas in Alberta appear to produce high numbers of fox by guys targeting coyotes and catching fox in their snares.
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Old 01-09-2017, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Big Grey Wolf View Post
Keg, your Northern area probably has high wolf and coyote numbers. My guess is they are keeping the fox numbers in check. The Parkland areas in Alberta appear to produce high numbers of fox by guys targeting coyotes and catching fox in their snares.
I lived in Wetaskiwin for 18 years, the rest of my 62 years on this planet have been spent in this area.

Things change. I don't know what it's like around central Alberta. Wetaskiwin, Camrose, Pigeon Lake, these days but I know that when I lived there there were far more Coyotes there then here.
And I know that the Coyote population here is about the same as it was when I was a kid.
And right now we have very few Fox and a ton of Wolves.

I don't see any connection between Coyote numbers and Wolf numbers.
The wolf population here was low up into the 1980s. Now it's very high, but the Coyote numbers seem about the same now as they were then.

I'm not sure about Fox, they haven't been around long enough for me to even start to draw any conclusions about their interaction with Wolves or Coyotes.

There were no Fox in the Wetaskiwin area when I lived there and next to none here back then either.
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I'm not allowed to run the train
The whistle I can't blow…
I'm not allowed to say how far
The railroad cars can go.
I'm not allowed to shoot off steam,
Nor even clang the bell…
But let the damn train jump the track
And see who catches Hell!
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Old 01-12-2017, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by KegRiver View Post
Things change. I don't know what it's like around central Alberta. Wetaskiwin, Camrose, Pigeon Lake, these days but I know that when I lived there there were far more Coyotes there then here.
And I know that the Coyote population here is about the same as it was when I was a kid.
And right now we have very few Fox and a ton of Wolves.
Keg, ever since you posted this I've been searching for an article on the internet that I read a couple of years ago. It explained in detail of how coyotes migrated in Alberta. According to the story, there never were any coyotes in northern portions of Alberta because it was all wolf territory. Amazingly, at least to me, not even 100 years ago there were very few coyotes even as far south as the Edmonton area where I am. All of the coyotes that we have now migrated from the plains in southern Alberta and worked their way north as more and more land was developed and the wolves pushed out. This may explain why you have fewer coyotes where you are as opposed to more southern regions.

I'm going to keep trying to find the article/info because it's pretty darned interesting.

PS. IMO it's just a matter of time before raccoons make the same migration and establish themselves farther and farther north.
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Old 01-12-2017, 06:01 PM
AlbertaAl AlbertaAl is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KegRiver View Post
I thought some of you might find this intersting.

Some of you may have seen this on facebook, for those who haven't, how's this for a seasons catch?




I love the last comment.
really ?????????
"Gullable" readers.. picture isn't real ... modified internet photo...jezzzzzzzzzzz
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Old 01-12-2017, 06:39 PM
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Maybe you just need to view the picture from a different angle, Al.

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Old 01-12-2017, 09:03 PM
Redneck 7 Redneck 7 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HunterDave View Post
Keg, ever since you posted this I've been searching for an article on the internet that I read a couple of years ago. It explained in detail of how coyotes migrated in Alberta. According to the story, there never were any coyotes in northern portions of Alberta because it was all wolf territory. Amazingly, at least to me, not even 100 years ago there were very few coyotes even as far south as the Edmonton area where I am. All of the coyotes that we have now migrated from the plains in southern Alberta and worked their way north as more and more land was developed and the wolves pushed out. This may explain why you have fewer coyotes where you are as opposed to more southern regions.

I'm going to keep trying to find the article/info because it's pretty darned interesting.

PS. IMO it's just a matter of time before raccoons make the same migration and establish themselves farther and farther north.
Not to derail the thread but I seen a racoon at the farm that it east of wainwright 20 minutes, and my brother seen one working on a lease one day by red deer.


That fox number is insane, I wonder how many he's caught in the years from then till now.
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Old 01-12-2017, 11:20 PM
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KegRiver KegRiver is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HunterDave View Post
Keg, ever since you posted this I've been searching for an article on the internet that I read a couple of years ago. It explained in detail of how coyotes migrated in Alberta. According to the story, there never were any coyotes in northern portions of Alberta because it was all wolf territory. Amazingly, at least to me, not even 100 years ago there were very few coyotes even as far south as the Edmonton area where I am. All of the coyotes that we have now migrated from the plains in southern Alberta and worked their way north as more and more land was developed and the wolves pushed out. This may explain why you have fewer coyotes where you are as opposed to more southern regions.

I'm going to keep trying to find the article/info because it's pretty darned interesting.

PS. IMO it's just a matter of time before raccoons make the same migration and establish themselves farther and farther north.
I read something similar. I don't doubt that much is true but it wouldn't have had anything to do with the presence of Wolves and it would have been well before my time.

Around here, there were as many Coyote when I was a kid as there are now. The Wolf numbers however have increased dramatically.

My dad came to the Peace country in 1927, there were about the same number of Coyotes then as there were when he died in 1988, or so he said.
And there were Wolves, more then there was when I was a kid from what dad said.

Fox were different. When he came into the country they were increasing.
By 1950 they were the staple of many trappers income. Then the rabies plaque and subsequent poisoning program wiped them out.
There were none anywhere in the district when I started learning how to trap. The first Fox I saw in the Peace district was a classic Silver that I saw east of Codotte lake in 1978.
The first Fox I caught walked into a Lynx snare of mine the winter of 1992.
Now I see them all over the north but there doesn't seem to be a lot of them.
__________________
I'm not allowed to run the train
The whistle I can't blow…
I'm not allowed to say how far
The railroad cars can go.
I'm not allowed to shoot off steam,
Nor even clang the bell…
But let the damn train jump the track
And see who catches Hell!
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  #15  
Old 01-12-2017, 11:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redneck 7 View Post
Not to derail the thread but I seen a racoon at the farm that it east of wainwright 20 minutes, and my brother seen one working on a lease one day by red deer.


That fox number is insane, I wonder how many he's caught in the years from then till now.
They seem to be increasing in the province but I doubt they will ever be plentiful. I think our winters will keep their numbers low, and confined to the south.

Dad talked a lot about seeing Skunks in the Peace district when he moved here but not Raccoon.
He had learned trapping by trapping Raccoon in Nova Scotia when he was a kid but he often said he had never seen one west of Thunder Bay.

I saw them in Vancouver when I lived there in the early seventies. They were all over the place down there.
I hear reports of them here, some from family members but I've never seen one here or even a track of one.
__________________
I'm not allowed to run the train
The whistle I can't blow…
I'm not allowed to say how far
The railroad cars can go.
I'm not allowed to shoot off steam,
Nor even clang the bell…
But let the damn train jump the track
And see who catches Hell!
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  #16  
Old 01-13-2017, 04:50 PM
Big Grey Wolf Big Grey Wolf is offline
 
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Keg, my understanding is most racoon in Alberta are generally in Southern portion. It is probably result of migration north from Montana as weather has warmed in last few years. It is considered as a fur bearing animal in Alberta.
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Old 01-17-2017, 08:45 PM
Trappermatt Trappermatt is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlbertaAl View Post
really ?????????
"Gullable" readers.. picture isn't real ... modified internet photo...jezzzzzzzzzzz
That pic and the man are as real as they come , Phil just broke the 1000 fox mark again this year as of a few days ago
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  #18  
Old 01-18-2017, 12:10 AM
Marty S Marty S is offline
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I ran into Mr brown at the NAFA sale a couple of times... super nice guy! A hard working guy and a knowledgeable trapper. He gave me his pict and I got it blown up and is on the wall in the depot.
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  #19  
Old 01-18-2017, 05:51 AM
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Impressive for sure, it's to bad they aren't worth much
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  #20  
Old 01-18-2017, 05:55 AM
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Hard work pays off eh!
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