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Old 12-08-2016, 12:33 AM
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sureshot sureshot is offline
 
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Default Overnight setups in ice fishing tents. Let's see them

Since it's that time of year again I thought it would be interesting to see how everyone sets up their tents for overnights on the ice. This will be my first year for overnight on the ice.
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Old 12-08-2016, 01:38 AM
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Overnight necessities are as follows.

Big tent: 6120i has a nice layout for overnighters, fatfish 9416i are good too. 6 mans like a quickfish 6 are ok but kind of tricky to fit 2 people in depending on cot sizes and gear. I really like the 6120i for overnights, it is a shorter tent and insulated so keeps the tent warm and the heat low. You can arrange one cot on each side and have an open space in the middle to get in and out and move around, also allows you to have heater in the middle(we put it in middle at one end) so both people are equally warm. On the tent side of cot can drill 2 holes each(1 in each corner) and have room for flasher, jaw jackers etc in that space.

Cots: A must have, tent temperatures range from freezing at ground level to probably 20 deg at the roof. They higher up you get the warmer you will be.

Air mattress: The cold air is below you and without an air mattress you will feel it.

Bedding: Most people would probably want a decent sleeping bag, don't use anything too fancy though because will probably get wet or fish slimed at some point. I often just use an old blanket if it is warm enough but I am a walking furnace lol.

Floor mats: Lay these out to keep the ice from melting, increase traction and so you can remove boots.

Heater: You need a good heater, the bigger the better as you can always turn them down. Single sunflower or a big buddy with hose attachment are the way to go. Don't waste time or money with the small propane bottles. If you are using a large non insulated tent you might even want a double sunflower or just don't go out on the stupid cold days.

Cooler: If going for multiple days and spending time outside of a heated tent/vehicle you probably want a cooler to try and keep food and drinks from freezing. Make sure you bring it in the tent when possible.

Food heater: We often take a small bbq or camp stove and a jetboil. Warm food and drinks are a huge benefit especially if out for multiple days. Some people rig up their heaters to cook above them but we already had this other stuff which works better.

That is pretty much what you need minus the last 2 if just doing a simple overnight. Here are some pics of our setup when we did Lake Athabasca last year.





Hang clothes from the roof to keep them warm and dry.

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Old 12-08-2016, 01:50 AM
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Cool pics. I have a quickfish 6, 2 buddy heaters which I'll run off of a 20lb tank. Was also thinking of rigging it up with the silver insulation.
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Old 12-08-2016, 09:57 AM
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No pics of ours, but we have a 4-6 man (cant remember how big) Insulated Otter ice shelter. Fit 3 cots side by side with a propane tank at our feet and one of those big heaters that sits on top. Put down those puzzle pieces for the floor. We did have a second heated tent for fishing. Nice and cozy!
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Old 12-08-2016, 11:17 AM
Kingfisher8 Kingfisher8 is offline
 
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Default School Bus

Ice fishing In Feb
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File Type: jpg School bus on ice.jpg (24.2 KB, 728 views)
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  #6  
Old 12-08-2016, 11:44 AM
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RavYak RavYak is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sureshot View Post
Cool pics. I have a quickfish 6, 2 buddy heaters which I'll run off of a 20lb tank. Was also thinking of rigging it up with the silver insulation.
I have the quickfish 6 with insulated roof. It isn't quite long enough to put both of our cots lengthwise so what we do is put one on one side of the tent and one on the other. It doesn't hold the heat in as good as our 6120i but I slept in it on Cold Lake with -30 and wind blowing, I had to sleep with the heater just a coupe feet away but I was warm.

That is actually one key to staying warm, if you orient yourself so you can absorb some of the heat directly instead of just relying on the inside temperature to be warm then you can get by on using a lot less propane. Part of why I like using my old green banket as the dark colour absorbs the infrared heat and keeps it warm even though there isn't really that much insulation quality.

With two buddy heaters, one at each end you should be toasty warm I would think.
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Old 12-08-2016, 11:57 AM
ak-71 ak-71 is offline
 
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I kept it semi-simple tent, cote (not for warmth but to be further from the water), sleeping mat (the foam one with reflective side) and -35C rated bag with liner, covering the ice is good too. I keep heater off when sleeping - more moisture, not very safe and not necessary with a good bag. One reason to keep it on is to keep hole and drinking water from freezing, but closing the hole usually works and for water - I remelt ice from cutting large soda bottles when they freeze (easier than melting snow and I don't trust boiling lake water here).
The coldest temp I actually tested my sleeping setup was below -40C in a backyard, and if you have poor sleeping mat water vapor from body makes sleeping bag to freeze to the mat and somewhat cool to sleep. So good mat is important. Ventilation is important too. Sleeping bag may have some frost on the outer shell, but it's normal, easy to shake off in the morning and doesn't mean it's cold to sleep.
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Old 12-08-2016, 01:08 PM
muzzy muzzy is offline
 
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You forgot a portapotty or a 5 gal pail with garbage bag and toilet seat. And take the bag away with you please
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Old 12-08-2016, 01:19 PM
huntsfurfish huntsfurfish is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muzzy View Post
You forgot a portapotty or a 5 gal pail with garbage bag and toilet seat. And take the bag away with you please
Agree! Very good suggestion. And worth repeating.
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Old 12-08-2016, 01:44 PM
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Yes if you are fishing busy lakes a garbage bag or toilet system is good to have. Even on remote lakes try to find somewhere that other people aren't going to stumble upon your deed...
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Old 12-08-2016, 05:36 PM
ak-71 ak-71 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RavYak View Post
Yes if you are fishing busy lakes a garbage bag or toilet system is good to have. Even on remote lakes try to find somewhere that other people aren't going to stumble upon your deed...
Half drilled hole is an accepted compromise, if properly filled? If lakes are so busy that it's not acceptable - these lakes are not worthy going to.
PS. BTW, forgot to note - 10in augers are the best if you choose to be serious about ice fishing, hole doesn't freeze for longer, and much more entertaining if you fish shallow.
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Old 12-08-2016, 07:03 PM
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neilsledder neilsledder is offline
 
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Went once last year but planning more this. I don't camp on the ice but use an outfitters tent on shore. We quad into a nice sized lake and set it up. That way we can sleep and stay comfortable with the wood stove. The down fall is no fishing all night long!


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Old 12-08-2016, 07:10 PM
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biggyJ biggyJ is offline
 
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What do you do about CO?

We stayed in the ice last year, and I had a horrible sleep because I kept thinking I wouldn't wake up with the big buddy on.

We had vents, but I was still worried.
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Old 12-08-2016, 07:13 PM
Supergrit Supergrit is offline
 
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Anyone ever try a zodi tent heater it would be safer and probably cut down on your condensation inside the tent.
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Old 12-08-2016, 07:38 PM
Kurt505 Kurt505 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neilsledder View Post
Went once last year but planning more this. I don't camp on the ice but use an outfitters tent on shore. We quad into a nice sized lake and set it up. That way we can sleep and stay comfortable with the wood stove. The down fall is no fishing all night long!


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Why not set up on the ice? I was thinking about taking my tent out on the ice this winter, was thinking maybe just laying out some plywood on the ice.
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Old 12-08-2016, 08:11 PM
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neilsledder neilsledder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt505 View Post
Why not set up on the ice? I was thinking about taking my tent out on the ice this winter, was thinking maybe just laying out some plywood on the ice.


I don't have the metal pole tent frame, and there is already a hunting camp on the edge of the lake.


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  #17  
Old 12-08-2016, 08:21 PM
Dragless Dragless is offline
 
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My friend says he's put up his outfitters tent on slave a few times I don't know how he said it up tho something about drilling a bunch of diagonal holes in the ice and 2x3 boards... He said worked really good tho.
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Old 12-08-2016, 08:35 PM
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neilsledder neilsledder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragless View Post
My friend says he's put up his outfitters tent on slave a few times I don't know how he said it up tho something about drilling a bunch of diagonal holes in the ice and 2x3 boards... He said worked really good tho.


That would work good!


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  #19  
Old 12-10-2016, 09:02 PM
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7magtime 7magtime is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RavYak View Post
Overnight necessities are as follows.

Big tent: 6120i has a nice layout for overnighters, fatfish 9416i are good too. 6 mans like a quickfish 6 are ok but kind of tricky to fit 2 people in depending on cot sizes and gear. I really like the 6120i for overnights, it is a shorter tent and insulated so keeps the tent warm and the heat low. You can arrange one cot on each side and have an open space in the middle to get in and out and move around, also allows you to have heater in the middle(we put it in middle at one end) so both people are equally warm. On the tent side of cot can drill 2 holes each(1 in each corner) and have room for flasher, jaw jackers etc in that space.

Cots: A must have, tent temperatures range from freezing at ground level to probably 20 deg at the roof. They higher up you get the warmer you will be.

Air mattress: The cold air is below you and without an air mattress you will feel it.

Bedding: Most people would probably want a decent sleeping bag, don't use anything too fancy though because will probably get wet or fish slimed at some point. I often just use an old blanket if it is warm enough but I am a walking furnace lol.

Floor mats: Lay these out to keep the ice from melting, increase traction and so you can remove boots.

Heater: You need a good heater, the bigger the better as you can always turn them down. Single sunflower or a big buddy with hose attachment are the way to go. Don't waste time or money with the small propane bottles. If you are using a large non insulated tent you might even want a double sunflower or just don't go out on the stupid cold days.

Cooler: If going for multiple days and spending time outside of a heated tent/vehicle you probably want a cooler to try and keep food and drinks from freezing. Make sure you bring it in the tent when possible.

Food heater: We often take a small bbq or camp stove and a jetboil. Warm food and drinks are a huge benefit especially if out for multiple days. Some people rig up their heaters to cook above them but we already had this other stuff which works better.

That is pretty much what you need minus the last 2 if just doing a simple overnight. Here are some pics of our setup when we did Lake Athabasca last year.





Hang clothes from the roof to keep them warm and dry.

Great gear info and pics RavYak! I've been considering trying an overnight or 2 with my 9416. Have most of the gear you mentioned, might have to give it a go this season.....
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Old 12-11-2016, 12:59 AM
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Willowtrail Willowtrail is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 7magtime View Post
Great gear info and pics RavYak! I've been considering trying an overnight or 2 with my 9416. Have most of the gear you mentioned, might have to give it a go this season.....
When I stay over night and can drive on, I take sheets of osb for a floor. Helps keep my feet dry in the middle of the night when I have to run to the can.

I also raise my buddy heater up on a milk crate so it doesn't warm the plywood and melt the ice underneath. It create sloppy plywood with lots of water underneath.

I run a couple battery powered fan/light combos on the ceiling. Put them on the roof poles and angle them to circulate the air.

We've been doing over night trips for 5 years now, every year we think of a few things to make it easier, more convenient and comfortable.
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Old 12-11-2016, 06:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowtrail View Post
When I stay over night and can drive on, I take sheets of osb for a floor. Helps keep my feet dry in the middle of the night when I have to run to the can.

I also raise my buddy heater up on a milk crate so it doesn't warm the plywood and melt the ice underneath. It create sloppy plywood with lots of water underneath.

I run a couple battery powered fan/light combos on the ceiling. Put them on the roof poles and angle them to circulate the air.

We've been doing over night trips for 5 years now, every year we think of a few things to make it easier, more convenient and comfortable.
Great info Willowtrail, thanks for sharing!
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:39 AM
Robbiej Robbiej is offline
 
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I am still finishing mine (overnight camper not tent) but here is a picture of the "bench end". The table collapses and there are boards behind the cushion that turn the back half of this trailer into a 6'x6' bed. The two holes on the hitch end can still be used when the bed is made. Haven't taken it for its maiden voyage/over night trip yet; should be done next week

Last edited by Robbiej; 12-11-2016 at 09:53 AM.
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Old 12-11-2016, 10:33 AM
Vacation Vacation is offline
 
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Camper looks real nice
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Old 12-11-2016, 03:33 PM
Andy44 Andy44 is offline
 
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Default Otter Hubs

Has anyone here ever used the Otter Outdoors Resort before? I'm looking at getting a giant hub for 2-3 of us to do overnight trips with and I'd love to hear a first hand opinion from someone who's used/owned one.
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Old 12-11-2016, 03:56 PM
Bigwoodsman Bigwoodsman is offline
 
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Wondering if anyone has tried draping a huge tarp over a ice tent to help reduce condensation? I'm thinking it would create an air space between the tent an the elements. Any thoughts.

BW
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  #26  
Old 12-11-2016, 04:06 PM
bearhunting bearhunting is offline
 
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Willowtrail sets up right ,I was lucky enough to meet up with them last season on cold lake ,I was very impressed with his setup and how comfortable it was,( I learned a lot) this year I will be heading back up for a few days,to stay on the ice . I have bought a 12x14 wall tent and am now building a metal frame for it ,ply wood floor and a wood stove,and perhaps a bucket of coal , two battery powered fan/light units.

I can hardy wait to try out the new setup (i know its not real portable but it should be very comfortable )

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Old 12-11-2016, 04:45 PM
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RavYak RavYak is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigwoodsman View Post
Wondering if anyone has tried draping a huge tarp over a ice tent to help reduce condensation? I'm thinking it would create an air space between the tent an the elements. Any thoughts.

BW
Wouldn't help that much, ultimately the temperature on the outside of the tent is going to be the factor and a simple tarp isn't going to change it that much.

I haven't found condensation to be an issue. Only time it kind of sucks is if it gets really cold and all the moisture freezes to the rough and then it warms up and starts dripping on you but that isn't that common and usually only drips for a short period. You can always crank up the heat for a bit to speed that dripping up if you are experiencing it.
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Old 10-12-2021, 03:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy44 View Post
Has anyone here ever used the Otter Outdoors Resort before? I'm looking at getting a giant hub for 2-3 of us to do overnight trips with and I'd love to hear a first hand opinion from someone who's used/owned one.
Sorry to necro-post, but I'm starting to think about ice fishing season. My wife and I are going to camp on the ice this year for the first time. We currently have a basic, non-insulated double-bubble Eskimo tent. It's good enough to get the job done, but we're thinking about upgrading to a bigger insulated unit that will have more space for sleeping/camping. The Otter Resort is what we were thinking might be best, but I'm wondering if Andy or anyone else has camped with two people on the ice and has any thoughts about what tent works best...?

Thanks in advance - can't wait for things to start locking up!!
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  #29  
Old 10-12-2021, 06:21 PM
AlbertanGP AlbertanGP is offline
 
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I don't have a hexagonal style hub shelter like the Otter Vortex Resort. I do plan on getting one this year to overnight camp by myself. What I have and use when I take my son out is an Eskimo 9416i. I've also camped myself in my Otter Vortex Lodge.

The typical 8'X8" shelters are pretty small even for solo camping. You can see videos on YT where guys do it, but it's really cramped if you have lots of toys (electronic's, etc.). The 8'X14" shelters like my 9416i or the Otter Vortex Monster Lodge work really well since you can use half for sleeping quarters and the other half like a normal 8'X8' Lodge for fishing. I feel like it's almost too much for one person, which is why I want to pick up a Vortex Resort to try this season. I think the hexagonal hub may the best for me and all the crap I bring along, whether for the day or overnight.

Since you're talking about bringing your wife, you'll have to decide what your sleeping on. Two single cots seem to work fine in the Resort, but a queen air mattress or whatever would be better in the Monster Lodge. If you're not sure what style you'd prefer and there aren't any to view set up in nearby shops, tape the bottom dimensions off on a garage floor or your yard and see what meet's with the boss's approval. Good luck, and don't forget a CO monitor!
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Old 10-12-2021, 09:56 PM
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The Fisherman Guy The Fisherman Guy is offline
 
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Hardwater season is approaching fast! Had to break ice on the pond this evening to retrieve the aerator, ice fishing isn't far off.

Check out the link below with advice on how to setup for an overnighter and be safe, and sleep comfortably:

Overnight Ice Fishing Hacks Vol 1

Overnight Ice Fishing Hacks Vol 2
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