Go Back   Alberta Outdoorsmen Forum > Main Category > Hunting Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-28-2021, 04:54 AM
Sundog57 Sundog57 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 312
Default Kitchen Knife Handles

Hi
I have several kitchen knives that have handles that are coming to the end of their working lives. Rivets are loose, the wood has eroded (after thirty or forty years of service) etc.
They're stainless and still have lots of good steel.
Is it difficult to put new scales on them?
Can someone direct me to where I might purchase rivets, material for scales, micarta (or something else if micarta is not a good choice) and where I might find good info on crafting new handles.
and... is this a worthwhile endeavour from a practical point of view, or should I just retire them - Grohmann's has lots of new ones LOL
Thx
__________________
Why hunt when I could buy meat?
Why have sex when I could opt for artificial insemination?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-28-2021, 05:51 AM
Sundog57 Sundog57 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 312
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundog57 View Post
Hi
I have several kitchen knives that have handles that are coming to the end of their working lives. Rivets are loose, the wood has eroded (after thirty or forty years of service) etc.
They're stainless and still have lots of good steel.
Is it difficult to put new scales on them?
Can someone direct me to where I might purchase rivets, material for scales, micarta (or something else if micarta is not a good choice) and where I might find good info on crafting new handles.
and... is this a worthwhile endeavour from a practical point of view, or should I just retire them - Grohmann's has lots of new ones LOL
Thx
PS - lots of info on Youtube (of course...duh)
Any suggestions though on preferred type and pitfalls on choice of fasteners, Corbys, rivets, screws, right type of epoxy, and how to avoid the dumbest of rookie mistakes, much appreciated
__________________
Why hunt when I could buy meat?
Why have sex when I could opt for artificial insemination?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-28-2021, 06:56 AM
Phil McCracken's Avatar
Phil McCracken Phil McCracken is offline
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Rocky Mtn House,AB
Posts: 224
Default

If you have adequate tools, replacing scales is not too hard. All you really need is a small belt sander, band saw or a simple scroll saw, drill, and lots of sandpaper.

Tempting to purchase supplies (handles, etc) from the larger knife supply retailers from the US. However, the shipping will kill you.

I recommend the following:

https://www.knifemaker.ca/

They have a decent inventory of handle materials, along with fasteners (ie. brass pins).

I recommend epoxy for securing scales to the metal. Lee Valley has excellent products, and free shipping if order is over $30.00. Gorilla 2 part epoxy will work, and available at CT.

One thing you need to remember: if you use hardwood, or some other composite, you may not be able to wash your kitchen knives in the dishwasher. Research that.

Lots of good YouTube tutorials available.

This is a fun project, Good Luck.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-28-2021, 09:11 AM
Dean2's Avatar
Dean2 Dean2 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Near Edmonton
Posts: 11,195
Default

Putting handles on knives is fun and pretty easy. I would guess that you have been putting these in a dishwasher, otherwise the blades would wear out long before the wood handles gave up the ghost. If you are going to continue to use the dishwasher I would suggest you put synthetic handles on them this time. Depending on the tang arrangement you can do one piece or two slabs then shape them with rasps, files and sand paper if you don't have the electric tools for it. Good way to fill some of the extra Covid basement time. You will have to post pictures of the project as you go along.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-28-2021, 09:27 AM
creeky creeky is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,041
Default

Some good tips already, if you do synthetic (micarta etc),then wear a mask (sanded dust is nasty/toxic).

X2 on Lee Valley's epoxy.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
__________________
#I Am An Outdoorsman And I Approve This Message


#creativity can't wait for technology
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-28-2021, 09:49 AM
CNP's Avatar
CNP CNP is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: WMU 303
Posts: 7,613
Default

Amazon has micarta scales, corby bolts, brass pins, mosaic pins, etc. I use LePage Professional Speed Set Epoxy.

Micarta is fairly expensive......but it is bullet/dishwasher proof.

I'm in Edmonton for a while and I haven't been to Lee Valley for a long time so I'm going to see what they have along the line of knife making supplies.

The tangs on these knives are covered with micarta scales purchased off amazon.ca ($20 for a pair of scales)

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-28-2021, 01:15 PM
raised by wolves raised by wolves is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,073
Default

Lee Valley has a selection of cutlery rivets available here in Canada. Most knife making supplies are available south of the border. I make a few knives in my free time. Drop me a note if you are in the Edmonton area and I can give you some guidance.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-28-2021, 02:04 PM
Sundog57 Sundog57 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 312
Default

Thanks for the invite
If they ever let us travel again I'll take you up on it.
Any preference functional/personal? between Corby screws, straight pins (peened or not) and cutler's rivets ?
__________________
Why hunt when I could buy meat?
Why have sex when I could opt for artificial insemination?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-28-2021, 03:49 PM
cccan cccan is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 187
Default

Princess auto has the corby bolts and micarta..
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-28-2021, 03:54 PM
CNP's Avatar
CNP CNP is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: WMU 303
Posts: 7,613
Default

Iíve never used corby
bolts, just pins. I donít or wouldnít peen them either. The scales are epoxied on and the pin holes will have epoxy in them also. Just sand the pins off smooth to the scales.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-28-2021, 03:55 PM
Savage Bacon's Avatar
Savage Bacon Savage Bacon is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Calgary-Red Deer area
Posts: 1,258
Default

Great time, and excuse to customize those knives.
__________________
I'm not really a licensed bodyman or heavy duty mechanic. I just play one at work.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-28-2021, 06:45 PM
hilt134 hilt134 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 710
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundog57 View Post
Hi
I have several kitchen knives that have handles that are coming to the end of their working lives. Rivets are loose, the wood has eroded (after thirty or forty years of service) etc.
They're stainless and still have lots of good steel.
Is it difficult to put new scales on them?
Can someone direct me to where I might purchase rivets, material for scales, micarta (or something else if micarta is not a good choice) and where I might find good info on crafting new handles.
and... is this a worthwhile endeavour from a practical point of view, or should I just retire them - Grohmann's has lots of new ones LOL
Thx
Do it just for the knowledge then buy new ones if you like. It cost barley anything but time. For wood material I would just buy knife scales from a wood shop like Black Forest in Calgary. For every thing else home depot and alberta knife supply should have you set. Goodluck!!
__________________
I seem to really be rather long winded.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-28-2021, 09:07 PM
raised by wolves raised by wolves is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,073
Default

I really dislike Corby attachments. With their large diametre, I feel they become a clutter on the handle and distract from a burl or grain in the scales. I prefer using 3/16 pins in most of my knives but I also use different styles of rivets. I love the nickel-silver rivets from Jantz Supply as they are very reliable and have clean machining. The rivets I mentioned previously, from Lee Valley, are also good but they are made for very thin handle scales so I usually only use them for leatherwork.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.