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  #31  
Old 07-01-2018, 08:27 AM
Sledhead71 Sledhead71 is offline
 
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I'm not a fan of air conditioning and have not had it in near 2 decades.

Couple weeks a year in the bad lands where the nights do not cool down much is fine by me...
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  #32  
Old 07-01-2018, 08:29 AM
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Romaniuk Heating And Air Conditioning get good reviews.

https://homestars.com/companies/2815...r-conditioning
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  #33  
Old 07-01-2018, 08:51 AM
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I see lots of people throwing around the square footage of their homes in hopes of an estimate on AC sizing and cost.

AC units are not sized on the square footage of a home or even the heat loss of a home. It is a factor, but just a factor in the equation.

The number one concern of a qualified HVAC estimator should be the duct work. Furnaces and air handlers are not pumps. The amount of air they are able to move is completely dependent on the size of the duct work, number of supply outlets and return air. Any contractor that does not count your vents, measure the exposed mains and calculate the air flow using a calculator, should be shown the door. The only exception is an experience contractor that actually designed and installed the duct work in your home or knows the exact duct design of the house you are living in. Always make certain he checks for proper return air in the lower levels or your nicely finished basement will be colder than a meat locker. This is especially true when your house was designed around in floor heating where inexperienced or lazy contractors feel they can get away with inadequate air flow. He/she should also ask specific questions about the comfort of your home and if you have had any airflow concerns or hot/cold spots. These are often easily dealt with by better balancing a system, adding a run or two, or adjusting the furnace or air handler.

The second step is determining the air flow capacity of the furnace/air handler. The furnace/air handler CFM out put is generally clearly marked on the manufacturers plate. It is also included in the model # of the unit. An experienced contractor should be able to point this out to you however you can look your furnace up on line if you have doubt.

If you have not got it yet, air flow is everything in HVAC, especially the AC part. An AC coil needs 350 to 400 CFM of air flow per ton or it will ice up and cost you a fortune to run. Some may still cool your home but when you get your electrical bill you will still be over heating.

Next up is determining the electrical requirements of the unit and install of both high and low voltage wiring. Plumbers, sheet metal techs and refrigerant techs are NOT electricians. You require an electrical permit drawn by a master electrician to legally install your AC. Do not assume, ASK. Low voltage requirements can be rectified with a new modern thermostat that runs off a couple or three wires or by adding a fast stat. Don't allow your contractor to move around low voltage wiring to make the AC work. Many an inexperienced contractor will use wires designed to stage the furnace or induce the fan during central exhaust cycles, to run the AC. You generally don't notice until heating season when your circulating fan, staging or accessories are no longer functioning. By this time the contractor is gone and you are left paying the money you saved on install fixing these issues.

Now that we have determined what the system is capable of doing, we can finally look at the square footage, heat loss and general exposure of the home. Have the windows been upgraded? Are we dealing with 2x4 or 2x6 construction? What is the R value of the insulation? Is the home exposed to southern sun all day? Is there an unusual amount of electronics like computers running? Is the home a walk out, bungalow or bi-level?

A well insulated 1400 square foot home on the north side of hill or well shaded with a bungalow type basement may be easily and efficiently cooled with a 2 ton unit. The same house moderately exposed on the hill top may require a 2.5 ton unit. If we build this same house as a walk out on the south side of the hill without any shading, 3 tons is not out of the question.

OR you can get a price/sizing over the phone, internet or big box store, wait for slick to come by and measure the top of the furnace for coil size and roll the dice that you luck into a good deal. Do you feel lucky?
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  #34  
Old 07-01-2018, 09:02 AM
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Those ratings for Reliance are unbelievable. I have never seen a company with that many complaints before. How the hell does that rate A+. Be interesting to see their quote but no way would I ever use them. I always check Google, Homestars and Yelp for reviews when I hire someone new and I have never seen ratings that bad except for Chub an ADT security.
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  #35  
Old 07-01-2018, 11:45 AM
rosh rosh is offline
 
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ARPIíS did a great job here.
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  #36  
Old 07-01-2018, 12:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosh View Post
ARPIíS did a great job here.
Where's here? There's Arpi's Industries in Calgary and Arpi's North in Edmonton, two separate companies from what I understand.
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  #37  
Old 07-01-2018, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Weedy1 View Post
Where's here? There's Arpi's Industries in Calgary and Arpi's North in Edmonton, two separate companies from what I understand.
Sorry. Calgary. They do the Costco, buy units through costco ARPIíS installs them. We also did humidifier, uv light, upgraded thermostat and a water line out front of house. All work was great.
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  #38  
Old 07-01-2018, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave barry View Post
Its cost me about $2790 last December
I feel lucky on the price I payed for mine looking at some of the prices people payed for theirs. $1800 installed. mind you it is a Mid efficient A/C unit for a 1200 sq. ft. home.
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  #39  
Old 07-01-2018, 01:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MK2750 View Post
I see lots of people throwing around the square footage of their homes in hopes of an estimate on AC sizing and cost.

AC units are not sized on the square footage of a home or even the heat loss of a home. It is a factor, but just a factor in the equation.

The number one concern of a qualified HVAC estimator should be the duct work. Furnaces and air handlers are not pumps. The amount of air they are able to move is completely dependent on the size of the duct work, number of supply outlets and return air. Any contractor that does not count your vents, measure the exposed mains and calculate the air flow using a calculator, should be shown the door. The only exception is an experience contractor that actually designed and installed the duct work in your home or knows the exact duct design of the house you are living in. Always make certain he checks for proper return air in the lower levels or your nicely finished basement will be colder than a meat locker. This is especially true when your house was designed around in floor heating where inexperienced or lazy contractors feel they can get away with inadequate air flow. He/she should also ask specific questions about the comfort of your home and if you have had any airflow concerns or hot/cold spots. These are often easily dealt with by better balancing a system, adding a run or two, or adjusting the furnace or air handler.

The second step is determining the air flow capacity of the furnace/air handler. The furnace/air handler CFM out put is generally clearly marked on the manufacturers plate. It is also included in the model # of the unit. An experienced contractor should be able to point this out to you however you can look your furnace up on line if you have doubt.

If you have not got it yet, air flow is everything in HVAC, especially the AC part. An AC coil needs 350 to 400 CFM of air flow per ton or it will ice up and cost you a fortune to run. Some may still cool your home but when you get your electrical bill you will still be over heating.

Next up is determining the electrical requirements of the unit and install of both high and low voltage wiring. Plumbers, sheet metal techs and refrigerant techs are NOT electricians. You require an electrical permit drawn by a master electrician to legally install your AC. Do not assume, ASK. Low voltage requirements can be rectified with a new modern thermostat that runs off a couple or three wires or by adding a fast stat. Don't allow your contractor to move around low voltage wiring to make the AC work. Many an inexperienced contractor will use wires designed to stage the furnace or induce the fan during central exhaust cycles, to run the AC. You generally don't notice until heating season when your circulating fan, staging or accessories are no longer functioning. By this time the contractor is gone and you are left paying the money you saved on install fixing these issues.

Now that we have determined what the system is capable of doing, we can finally look at the square footage, heat loss and general exposure of the home. Have the windows been upgraded? Are we dealing with 2x4 or 2x6 construction? What is the R value of the insulation? Is the home exposed to southern sun all day? Is there an unusual amount of electronics like computers running? Is the home a walk out, bungalow or bi-level?

A well insulated 1400 square foot home on the north side of hill or well shaded with a bungalow type basement may be easily and efficiently cooled with a 2 ton unit. The same house moderately exposed on the hill top may require a 2.5 ton unit. If we build this same house as a walk out on the south side of the hill without any shading, 3 tons is not out of the question.

OR you can get a price/sizing over the phone, internet or big box store, wait for slick to come by and measure the top of the furnace for coil size and roll the dice that you luck into a good deal. Do you feel lucky?
Correct our quote was based on redoing the furnace with a complete new install and he wanted the house plans to get the cubic meter air volume and window sizes before gives us an answer. We are happy.
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  #40  
Old 07-02-2018, 01:32 AM
brslk brslk is offline
 
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Once you have central air you'll wonder how you ever lived without it. It's the second best thing since sliced bread.
We used Clear Skies for both our houses and I'd recommend them to anyone that asks. I had an issue with the mounting of the garage furnace and they sent someone out after warranty and fixed it for free.
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  #41  
Old 07-03-2018, 08:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MK2750 View Post
10 is a reasonable budget as long as the existing duct work is in good and serviceable condition and there is not a lot of extra electrical to be done.

In circumstances of a major HVAC purchase people are often consumed with the thought of getting ripped off. In my experience, there is more danger in paying too little than paying too much. Contractors will find a way to fit into your budget even if your budget is unrealistic. They install low grade product, avoid work that should be done but not required by code or don't even meet code requirements by not getting permits and inspections.

Remember, you are only buying one system, not 100. If you pay a little more going with a contractor with a long track record of quality work it will be money well spent. Reputable contractors take the time to do a thorough site evaluation, install quality product and employ experienced tradesmen. Most importantly, they stand behind their work and are there for you in the future. Even the best equipment can give problems and all require qualified maintenance.

Anyway, I like 2 stage variable speed furnaces and ACs of at least 15 SEER with scroll type compressors. There are many good brands and as mentioned the install is the most important thing.

All things being equal I would choose a York/Coleman TM9V matched up with a York/Coleman CC7 AC. The 10 year extended P&L warranty is inexpensive from the parent company Johnson Controls, in fact we offer it at no charge.

My second choice would be a Trane S9V2 matched up with an XLi AC. This choice would likely blow your budget but it is good stuff. The extended warranty is outrageously priced but would be nice to have.
I WISH I could charge 10k for a system like that... If we charged much more than 8k for a TM9V and an upgraded YCG condenser we wouldn't get the job. Calgary is very competitive...

It really depends where you are in the province. Prices are good in some parts and in other places it's a lot tighter.

A 'standard' unit here will run in the $3k range while an upgraded unit is closer to $4k. Furnace replacements are comparable to those numbers...
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  #42  
Old 07-03-2018, 09:26 AM
DisplacedFlatlander DisplacedFlatlander is offline
 
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Iím in Calgary.

16 seer 2.5 ton. 5,075
UV Purifier. 495
5Ē filter & cabinet. 275
Hvac service. 103
Costco gift cards. -650
Net. 5,300

Arpiís ended up being my installer from the Heritage Costco


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  #43  
Old 07-03-2018, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don K View Post
I WISH I could charge 10k for a system like that... If we charged much more than 8k for a TM9V and an upgraded YCG condenser we wouldn't get the job. Calgary is very competitive...

It really depends where you are in the province. Prices are good in some parts and in other places it's a lot tighter.

A 'standard' unit here will run in the $3k range while an upgraded unit is closer to $4k. Furnace replacements are comparable to those numbers...
In comparing prices I believe we are in a more competitive market. The standard units are the same price or lower here. We are still a small enough community that everyone knows of every contractor so it is not unusual for a customer to get 4 or more quotes, many of which work out of their home or small bay with little overhead and are owner operated. My boss knows and corresponds with some of the big players in the Calgary and Edmonton markets and we estimate average pricing to be at least 5-10% lower here.
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  #44  
Old 07-03-2018, 07:24 PM
dewalt18 dewalt18 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DisplacedFlatlander View Post
Iím in Calgary.

16 seer 2.5 ton. 5,075
UV Purifier. 495
5Ē filter & cabinet. 275
Hvac service. 103
Costco gift cards. -650
Net. 5,300

Arpiís ended up being my installer from the Heritage Costco


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Sorry about your luck.
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  #45  
Old 07-03-2018, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by DiabeticKripple View Post
Yikes!

Iíd be running.
Absolutley.....

Not sure what the prices are these days but we put a 3 ton for 2700 Sq ft 2 storey for $3000.00. This was in 2012 though....

Shop around and take your time for the best deal....

$4000 for a 2 ton is way over priced IMO....
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  #46  
Old 07-03-2018, 08:25 PM
honda610 honda610 is offline
 
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I just had one installed in Athabasca 1300 sq ft house. I Did the electrical wiring and with tax and a fitted cover was 4100. Ian not sure how I lived without it before.
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  #47  
Old 07-03-2018, 08:37 PM
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Like MK stated - go with the outfit that offers options and does their homework with measuring windows, looking at ducts, ceiling heights, asking about insulation, etc... was quoted $9000 "all in" for a top of line high efficiency unit and offered a mid/high option at $7500 from the same contractor.

Had another outfit come in - quote me a few grand less, play games with not properly describing the unit on the quote or offering any installation details and didn't even look at the furnaces and existing A/C unit.

House is 2800 ft 2 2 story built in 80's.

Needless to say, I'm spending the extra money with the outfit who did the homework.
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  #48  
Old 07-04-2018, 06:14 AM
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I got Reliance and Robs plumbing coming in for inspection and quotes on tuesday. I will let you know what there quotes are. Should be between $ 3000 and $4000 and from all your replies and internet research should be a 2 ton. Thanks guy's !
Got the two quotes.

Rob's / Albertan , $5800

Reliance , $ 3800
Both Before GST. Both quoted 16 seer and 2 ton

$2000 difference in price. WOW ! I thought prices would be closer to 10% to 20% difference.

Looking for a third quote now to see which one is out to lunch. I'm pretty sure Rob's is a rip off for pricing, and not sure about Reliance with installation and servicing and professionalism.
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  #49  
Old 07-04-2018, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Kim473 View Post
Got the two quotes.

Rob's / Albertan , $5800

Reliance , $ 3800
Both Before GST. Both quoted 16 seer and 2 ton

$2000 difference in price. WOW ! I thought prices would be closer to 10% to 20% difference.

Looking for a third quote now to see which one is out to lunch. I'm pretty sure Rob's is a rip off for pricing, and not sure about Reliance with installation and servicing and professionalism.
Without details, it is like asking how much is it to buy a car. SEER has nothing to do with quality. It would be like saying a Corolla is a nicer car than a Lexis because it gets better gas mileage.

IIRC Reliance uses mostly contractor grade Goodman. Unless there is some electrical, ducting issues or you are 100 miles out of town, your quote is a little high but not bad. Goodman uses both types of compressors. If you stepped up to a scroll at that price it is a pretty good deal.

Having said that, their 500 complaints at the BBB would still turn me away. It looks like a crap shoot as to whether it will be installed right and that is the most important thing. It also looks like there is little likelihood they will be helpful if there are problems.

The other quote seems high but again, if there is issues, that can significantly add to the price. Some issues, like adding duct work, costs now but saves you money over time. If the lower pricing does not include needed upgrades, then you will actually end up paying more over time.

You also make no mention as to brand or model. Top end brands demand more money generally because they are better units. In this day and age, you don't get a top rating without doing a lot of things right. Trane/American Standard for example receives the top grade according to customer reviews by Consumer Reports, Goodman is at the other end of the spectrum.

You also don't mention warranty which can swing the price significantly.

IMO a quality scroll compressor unit, installed with permits should come in between your 3800 number and 4500 depending on brand. Add a long run of 220, an extra panel or a bunch of ducting and your 5800 number might be a steal.
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  #50  
Old 07-04-2018, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by dewalt18 View Post
Sorry about your luck.
How could you possibly have any clue as to this persons luck without knowing details? It is literally like saying "My car only cost $500 to fix and yours cost $1000. You must have been ripped off."

Electrical complications alone can add $1000 to a price. Units range from contractor at under $3000 to top end staging units at well over $7000. There is 50 foot runs over ceilings and 10 foot runs right behind the furnace. Your commend is nothing more than trolling.

While you have your crystal ball out. I just purchased a 2017 sedan for $19,000. Do you think I got a good deal or are you sorry about my luck as well????
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  #51  
Old 07-04-2018, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MK2750 View Post
Without details, it is like asking how much is it to buy a car. SEER has nothing to do with quality. It would be like saying a Corolla is a nicer car than a Lexis because it gets better gas mileage.

IIRC Reliance uses mostly contractor grade Goodman. Unless there is some electrical, ducting issues or you are 100 miles out of town, your quote is a little high but not bad. Goodman uses both types of compressors. If you stepped up to a scroll at that price it is a pretty good deal.

Having said that, their 500 complaints at the BBB would still turn me away. It looks like a crap shoot as to whether it will be installed right and that is the most important thing. It also looks like there is little likelihood they will be helpful if there are problems.

The other quote seems high but again, if there is issues, that can significantly add to the price. Some issues, like adding duct work, costs now but saves you money over time. If the lower pricing does not include needed upgrades, then you will actually end up paying more over time.

You also make no mention as to brand or model. Top end brands demand more money generally because they are better units. In this day and age, you don't get a top rating without doing a lot of things right. Trane/American Standard for example receives the top grade according to customer reviews by Consumer Reports, Goodman is at the other end of the spectrum.

You also don't mention warranty which can swing the price significantly.

IMO a quality scroll compressor unit, installed with permits should come in between your 3800 number and 4500 depending on brand. Add a long run of 220, an extra panel or a bunch of ducting and your 5800 number might be a steal.
Both quoted same units same options as well as in the same house so long electrical runs and change duct work is out of the equation. Unit will be installed other side of electrical wall right behind the panel and the furnace is only 10 feet away from same wall, no ceiling in the furnace room. Condensate pump included.

Rob's quote is $2,000 more ! I guess they use gold wire as well as gold piping.

I just called Reliance and they will be out tomorrow afternoon to install the unit including gst and a cover for $3997.00 . Goodman 2 ton 16 seer scroll type.

Will let you all know if any problems arise as well as there workmanship and professionalism.
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  #52  
Old 07-04-2018, 09:09 PM
dewalt18 dewalt18 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MK2750 View Post
How could you possibly have any clue as to this persons luck without knowing details? It is literally like saying "My car only cost $500 to fix and yours cost $1000. You must have been ripped off."

Electrical complications alone can add $1000 to a price. Units range from contractor at under $3000 to top end staging units at well over $7000. There is 50 foot runs over ceilings and 10 foot runs right behind the furnace. Your commend is nothing more than trolling.

While you have your crystal ball out. I just purchased a 2017 sedan for $19,000. Do you think I got a good deal or are you sorry about my luck as well????
My "crystal ball" is just a touch over 20 years in the trade. All aspects of it, from residential, new construction, reno, retrofit, kicthen exhaust, to A/C install, to fresh out of the ground hospital, to condo building, commercial reno, base building, schools, hotels, and anything else you can mention. I've done estimatiating, project management, dragged linesets, spread duct seal, humped pipe, and argued with architects and engineers. I'm a red seal journeyman, a city qualified tradesman, and now working as a freelance consultant to companies who laugh at projects that don't hit seven figures.

Sorry to hear you had to buy a sedan, I'm more of a pickup guy myself
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  #53  
Old 07-04-2018, 11:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dewalt18 View Post
My "crystal ball" is just a touch over 20 years in the trade. All aspects of it, from residential, new construction, reno, retrofit, kicthen exhaust, to A/C install, to fresh out of the ground hospital, to condo building, commercial reno, base building, schools, hotels, and anything else you can mention. I've done estimatiating, project management, dragged linesets, spread duct seal, humped pipe, and argued with architects and engineers. I'm a red seal journeyman, a city qualified tradesman, and now working as a freelance consultant to companies who laugh at projects that don't hit seven figures.

Sorry to hear you had to buy a sedan, I'm more of a pickup guy myself
Don't worry, I have a pick up too. With all that experience you would think you would know better than commenting on a job with no idea what needs to be done.

Your intention was to make yourself look smart by making a troll comment "sorry about your luck" trying to belittle another member for his choice in air conditioner. You would think in all your wisdom you would offer some advice to those that ask rather than making a feeble attempt to boost your own ego.
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  #54  
Old 07-05-2018, 06:44 AM
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Originally Posted by MK2750 View Post
The number one concern of a qualified HVAC estimator should be the duct work. Furnaces and air handlers are not pumps. The amount of air they are able to move is completely dependent on the size of the duct work, number of supply outlets and return air. Any contractor that does not count your vents, measure the exposed mains and calculate the air flow using a calculator, should be shown the door. The only exception is an experience contractor that actually designed and installed the duct work in your home or knows the exact duct design of the house you are living in. Always make certain he checks for proper return air in the lower levels or your nicely finished basement will be colder than a meat locker. This is especially true when your house was designed around in floor heating where inexperienced or lazy contractors feel they can get away with inadequate air flow. He/she should also ask specific questions about the comfort of your home and if you have had any airflow concerns or hot/cold spots. These are often easily dealt with by better balancing a system, adding a run or two, or adjusting the furnace or air handler.

The second step is determining the air flow capacity of the furnace/air handler. The furnace/air handler CFM out put is generally clearly marked on the manufacturers plate. It is also included in the model # of the unit. An experienced contractor should be able to point this out to you however you can look your furnace up on line if you have doubt.

If you have not got it yet, air flow is everything in HVAC, especially the AC part. An AC coil needs 350 to 400 CFM of air flow per ton or it will ice up and cost you a fortune to run. Some may still cool your home but when you get your electrical bill you will still be over heating.
With ^^^ being said, I have often wondered how a resi contractor determines the actual air flow of an existing installation where the homeowner doesn't want a new furnace? Do any of the contractors do traverses or static pressure curves to determine the true operating point of the blower?
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  #55  
Old 07-05-2018, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Weedy1 View Post
With ^^^ being said, I have often wondered how a resi contractor determines the actual air flow of an existing installation where the homeowner doesn't want a new furnace? Do any of the contractors do traverses or static pressure curves to determine the true operating point of the blower?
New furnace or not is not relevant. A contractor first needs to determine what the air handler/furnace is capable of, then he needs to determine maximum and minimum air flow the duct system may be capable of.

There is some differing options as to what static pressure variable should be used to determine duct sizing. Many of our local contractors insists on using a static pressure factor that ices coils and trips limit switches. I have talked to dozens of homeowners that are completely frustrated with equipment that just wont function properly due to under sized ducting. They do this obviously to save money, along with the lightest gauge tin they can get away with. At best you get a noisy and inefficient system, at worst the system just doesn't function or fails prematurely.

So to answer your question, it is very difficult to determine the exact airflow without x-ray vision or some background info of what is in finished walls and ceilings. It is not difficult however to determine if you meet the minimum requirements of the equipment you wish to install simply by measuring the exposed duct work at the furnace, counting the registers/returns and checking air flow at the registers. A simple slide type duct sizing calculator and a little math is all that is needed.

The rule of thumb is a minimum of 350 to 400 CFM per ton of AC.
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  #56  
Old 07-06-2018, 05:48 AM
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Installers were here at noon. finished by 3, electrician was here at 4, unit running by 5.30 . When I got home at 7 the temp in the house was at 22 , dropped from 25 when the electrician arrived. House has been a nice comfortable 22 all night. They did a great job ! Very professional and a very neat job. The only problems are, they didn't leave a manual and the winter cover is on back order.
Seems that the unit that I agreed to , ( Goodman 16 seer ) was out of stock so they installed a ( Amana 16 seer ) Same manufacture, looks identical but with a better warranty. Lifetime compressor ( if it fails they replace the complete unit ) and 10 year parts. Fairly quiet for a mid range unit.

I'm very happy with the service, installation, and the unit so far. Guess we will see in the next couple months and years to come.
Hats off to Reliance. and Amy for making this happen.
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Kim

Gonna get me a 16" perch.
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  #57  
Old 07-06-2018, 06:46 AM
250mark1 250mark1 is offline
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 114
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we had a 2 ton 13 seer contractor line in our old house 1032 sqft bungalow
worked well but was loud ( could hear the compressor running in the house ) which was ok as it was right under my old azzhat neighbours master bedroom window lol

in our new house 1500 sqft modified bi level with the master bedroom over the garage ( southwest facing )
went with a 3.5 ton 18 seer unit with a scroll compressor as per my friends recomendation who did the sizing and install

this 3.5 ton unit is super quite compared to the old 2 ton unit in the old house
cost difference all in was about $500.00
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  #58  
Old 07-10-2018, 07:50 AM
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Kim473 Kim473 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Edmonton
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I should have installed this central air conditioner years ago. Working great ! I love it. I highly recommend central air if you can afford it. Beats the hell out of the noisey portable unit even though it worked great. The house is keeping at a comfortable 22 degrees day and night. 21 degrees is too cold.

I bet my electricity bill will be less also compared to running the portable unit, as the central air only cycles about every 1/2 hr during the 26 degree days compared to constantly running day and night with the portable unit.
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Kim

Gonna get me a 16" perch.
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  #59  
Old 07-10-2018, 08:24 AM
Donkey Oatey Donkey Oatey is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,260
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Just got a quote for a couple options. Looking for feedback.

Option #1
GOODMAN GMSS Single Stage Furnace 93%
GOODMAN GSX 13 A/C

Option #2
GOODMAN GMVC 2 stage Variable Speed Furnace 96%
GOODMAN GSX 13 A/C

Small bi-level house so going with a 1.5ton AC unit. There is a $1000 difference between the two installed. $6500 vs $7500 plus GST.
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Originally Posted by huntinstuff View Post
Attention Anti Hunters
Sit back
Pour yourself a tea

Watch us "sportsmen" attack each other and destroy ourselves from within.

From road hunters vs "real hunters" to bowhunters vs rifle hunters, long bows and recurves vs compound user to bow vs crossbow to white hunters vs Native hunters etc etc etc
.....

Enjoy the easy ride, anti hunters. Strange to me why we seem to be doing your job for you.

Excuse me while I go puke.
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  #60  
Old 07-10-2018, 08:57 AM
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Dean2 Dean2 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 5,653
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donkey Oatey View Post
Just got a quote for a couple options. Looking for feedback.

Option #1
GOODMAN GMSS Single Stage Furnace 93%
GOODMAN GSX 13 A/C

Option #2
GOODMAN GMVC 2 stage Variable Speed Furnace 96%
GOODMAN GSX 13 A/C

Small bi-level house so going with a 1.5ton AC unit. There is a $1000 difference between the two installed. $6500 vs $7500 plus GST.
I would go with option 2. the two stage furnace will do a better job year round. Leave it on re-circ permanently, runs on level 1. Steps up to level 2 when AC or furnace is running. Continuous air circulation makes a big difference in comfort level.

For a new furnace and AC, those are really good prices but I do not know the GOODMAN line of products at all so that could be why the prices are so low.

One word of advice for anyone getting new HVAC gear, REGISTER IT WITH THE MANUFACTURER to make sure you get max warranty coverage. It have become uncommon to have to register for warranty but with HVAC it REALLY is necessary or you will get a real short coverage.

P.S> Just Googled Goodman - Doesn't look to good to me on the overall but 4 GOODMAN units, including the GSX13 (number 4) you are quoted on are rated in the top ten for 2018.


https://www.furnacecompare.com/air-c...odman/reviews/


Popularity:
#49 of 68 brands of central air conditioners
26% of customers recommend
2 of 5 stars 891 reviews

Very Satisfied
225
Somewhat Satisfied
14
Neutral
25
Somewhat Unsatisfied
39
Very Unsatisfied
588
https://www.furnacecompare.com/air-c...odman/reviews/

Last edited by Dean2; 07-10-2018 at 09:10 AM.
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