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  #31  
Old 07-10-2018, 09:05 AM
Encephalophagous Encephalophagous is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Okotok View Post
Looks like a tarantula hawk. They like to paralyze tarantulas and use them as a food source for their spawn.
I agree Tarantula hawk. Also glad they aren't here since they have about the 2nd or 3rd most painful sting among insects.
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  #32  
Old 07-10-2018, 09:32 AM
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Default wasp--bees-hornets

Some years ago at a remote ont bear camp, the owner brought some 45gal drums of honey for bait,I open them up to put a little on each bear bait.The hot weather hit, and it seems everone of the above for hundreds of miles arrived for the feast.You could not get close and zap, something had to be done.The owner rigged up a propane flame thrower,and I the most expendable was selected to man this untested device, properly protected, I waded intothis massive cloud,of now angry, protective[as above]
The valve open, lit, a hugh ball of fire covered the whole area,in an instant there were thousands of wingless aboves walking around,wondering what the hell just happened.
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  #33  
Old 07-10-2018, 04:20 PM
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I find the best way is to hit at night, with a can of flammable spray.
Step 1. Spray Directly inside nest.
Step 2. Ignite... (Boom)
Nest completely neutralized in less than a minute.
Never failed me, havenít been stung yet.
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  #34  
Old 07-10-2018, 07:10 PM
coyoteman coyoteman is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ice View Post
I find the best way is to hit at night, with a can of flammable spray.
Step 1. Spray Directly inside nest.
Step 2. Ignite... (Boom)
Nest completely neutralized in less than a minute.
Never failed me, havenít been stung yet.
Dont fool me, you are ex navy seal right?
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  #35  
Old 07-10-2018, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Jays toyz View Post
I was stung and bit by a bald faced hornet (not a hornet) multiple times recently, because they are *******s that hate brush saws. It was without a doubt the most painful sting I have had and I get stung every year by yellowjackets often by a few at a time. With the diameter of a tennis ball it felt like a second degree burn that was covered in mosquito bites that had hives. Now I have a hole where the ******* bit me. So the question to the wealth of knowledge that is this forum.
Is the bite of a wasp poisonous?
Definately poisonous or venimous . For eexample honey bee venom is 1000 times more deadly by volume than a rattle snake venom.
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  #36  
Old 07-10-2018, 09:10 PM
Jays toyz Jays toyz is offline
 
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This guy tried to make friends the other day. No idea what he is. Stung twice this year already by bald face hornets. Once each thankfully
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  #37  
Old 07-11-2018, 07:16 AM
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Okotok Okotok is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Jays toyz View Post
This guy tried to make friends the other day. No idea what he is. Stung twice this year already by bald face hornets. Once each thankfully
Looks like a Giant wood wasp. Pretty much harmless but scary looking.
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  #38  
Old 07-11-2018, 07:28 AM
Jays toyz Jays toyz is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Okotok View Post
Looks like a Giant wood wasp. Pretty much harmless but scary looking.
Ahhh! Thanks for digging the sliver out of my mind. Nobody I showed it to had seen one before.
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  #39  
Old 07-11-2018, 07:32 AM
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If yellow jackets are a problem camping hang a piece of fish skin with a little meat on it over a bowl of water the wasps will gorge themselves then fall in the bowl and drown.
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  #40  
Old 07-11-2018, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Okotok View Post
Looks like a Giant wood wasp. Pretty much harmless but scary looking.
I agree. Appears to be a Banded Horntail. Looks fearsome but harmless as mentioned. That is not a "stinger" but a ovipositor.

http://www.insectsofalberta.com/horntail.htm
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  #41  
Old 07-11-2018, 12:35 PM
Chetywn Chetywn is offline
 
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Default Wasp anatomy

This tells you all you need to know about wasps/hornets right here...

https://knowyourmeme.com/photos/956772-proper-anatomy
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  #42  
Old 07-11-2018, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Chetywn View Post
This tells you all you need to know about wasps/hornets right here...

https://knowyourmeme.com/photos/956772-proper-anatomy
Ha! How true.
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  #43  
Old 07-11-2018, 04:50 PM
KodiakHntr KodiakHntr is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Kurt505 View Post

They are the nastiest bug we got in these parts, and they get huge. I watched one hunting at my cabin once. It would fly in, go right to the window where there were flies and wasps trying to get out. He would kill the fly or wasp then fly out the door with it, then 15 minutes later it would be back to grab another one. It was amazing how he knew the difference between the door and the window.

Years ago, back when I was mostly a field monkey hanging ribbons we used to find great fun catching horse flies and using hip chain thread to hang a little loop around their heads and tie them off to the pickup antenna.

One day my coworker caught one, and we did the usual loop and tie with a little less than an antenna worth of line, so the horsefly could amuse himself flying around on his leash.

Wasn't a minute until a big hornet zoomed out of the brush and attacked the horsefly in the air, stung him, and then tried to fly away with it. He hit the end of the leash a couple times, and then hung on and fell to the end of the line. We snuck up on him, as we could see that he was doing something, and he was trying to chew through the line that was tied around the horseflies neck. If you are familiar with that thread, it is tough stuff, and made up of a bunch of thinner threads. Hornet gave up on the line, so he chewed through the horseflies neck and left his head hanging there and flew to a branch on a tree so he could eat the fly, then he split.

We looked at each other, and my coworker grabbed another horsefly to retie one up. As we are doing that, we noticed a hornet nest about 20m off the road. We end up catching two horse flies, and tying them off. Maybe 2 minutes later as they are both buzzing at the end of the leash, what I assumed to be the original hornet came zipping back, grabbed the fly, and didn't even try to fly away with him, just stung him and fell to the end of the line and started chewing his head off. As he leaves, another hornet grabs the other one, and DOES THE EXACT SAME THING.

Did the first one communicate with the second one? How did the second one know to not try to fly away with the fly immediately? How did he know to just chop off the fly head so he could take him?!?!?!

Creepy AF.
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  #44  
Old 07-11-2018, 07:18 PM
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They are really bad this year. I was out shooting skeet with a friend just as the snow started melting off this year and we were getting swarmed then. Last weekend I stopped for a leak on camp alexo road and I was afraid I was going to get my pet jungle snake chomped on they were so bad. Yeesh
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  #45  
Old 07-11-2018, 07:53 PM
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Wasp venom is good for you. The wasp just added 5 years to your life. Embrace the burn. Wasp/Bee venom excellent for MS patients. 50-100 stings should get you to 100.
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  #46  
Old 07-12-2018, 05:16 AM
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I just read in the Herald that a guy from Chestermere has severe brain trauma after being stung by a wasp a few weeks ago.
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  #47  
Old 07-12-2018, 06:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodiakHntr View Post
Years ago, back when I was mostly a field monkey hanging ribbons we used to find great fun catching horse flies and using hip chain thread to hang a little loop around their heads and tie them off to the pickup antenna.

One day my coworker caught one, and we did the usual loop and tie with a little less than an antenna worth of line, so the horsefly could amuse himself flying around on his leash.

Wasn't a minute until a big hornet zoomed out of the brush and attacked the horsefly in the air, stung him, and then tried to fly away with it. He hit the end of the leash a couple times, and then hung on and fell to the end of the line. We snuck up on him, as we could see that he was doing something, and he was trying to chew through the line that was tied around the horseflies neck. If you are familiar with that thread, it is tough stuff, and made up of a bunch of thinner threads. Hornet gave up on the line, so he chewed through the horseflies neck and left his head hanging there and flew to a branch on a tree so he could eat the fly, then he split.

We looked at each other, and my coworker grabbed another horsefly to retie one up. As we are doing that, we noticed a hornet nest about 20m off the road. We end up catching two horse flies, and tying them off. Maybe 2 minutes later as they are both buzzing at the end of the leash, what I assumed to be the original hornet came zipping back, grabbed the fly, and didn't even try to fly away with him, just stung him and fell to the end of the line and started chewing his head off. As he leaves, another hornet grabs the other one, and DOES THE EXACT SAME THING.

Did the first one communicate with the second one? How did the second one know to not try to fly away with the fly immediately? How did he know to just chop off the fly head so he could take him?!?!?!

Creepy AF.
That's pretty wild for sure. It's amazing how intelligent they are.
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  #48  
Old 07-12-2018, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodiakHntr View Post
Years ago, back when I was mostly a field monkey hanging ribbons we used to find great fun catching horse flies and using hip chain thread to hang a little loop around their heads and tie them off to the pickup antenna.

One day my coworker caught one, and we did the usual loop and tie with a little less than an antenna worth of line, so the horsefly could amuse himself flying around on his leash.

Wasn't a minute until a big hornet zoomed out of the brush and attacked the horsefly in the air, stung him, and then tried to fly away with it. He hit the end of the leash a couple times, and then hung on and fell to the end of the line. We snuck up on him, as we could see that he was doing something, and he was trying to chew through the line that was tied around the horseflies neck. If you are familiar with that thread, it is tough stuff, and made up of a bunch of thinner threads. Hornet gave up on the line, so he chewed through the horseflies neck and left his head hanging there and flew to a branch on a tree so he could eat the fly, then he split.

We looked at each other, and my coworker grabbed another horsefly to retie one up. As we are doing that, we noticed a hornet nest about 20m off the road. We end up catching two horse flies, and tying them off. Maybe 2 minutes later as they are both buzzing at the end of the leash, what I assumed to be the original hornet came zipping back, grabbed the fly, and didn't even try to fly away with him, just stung him and fell to the end of the line and started chewing his head off. As he leaves, another hornet grabs the other one, and DOES THE EXACT SAME THING.

Did the first one communicate with the second one? How did the second one know to not try to fly away with the fly immediately? How did he know to just chop off the fly head so he could take him?!?!?!

Creepy AF.
Good story. Did same with Dental floss. Noose around horsefly neck. Then held onto the dental floss. Cheap, small RC fly. Lol.
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  #49  
Old 07-12-2018, 07:58 AM
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I have had to get rid of 2 nests this week alone.......1 in my BBQ and 1 under my shooting table. Yesterday I sat down at my shooting table (which is always out at my range ) and before I knew it a wasp stung me in the eyebrow. A little swollen today but no pain after the first couple of minutes.
For both i just sprayed the nest heavily with raid and the directional wasp spray , waited a minute or so and then quickly crushed the nest with a broom. I followed up by respraying the area heavily on and off for the next 5 minutes and had no more problems.
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  #50  
Old 07-12-2018, 08:22 AM
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I had an easily accessible nest in my shed. About twice the size of a softball. Snuck up on it with a kitchen catcher, ripped it off, tied the bag and gave it a few healthy stomps then into the garbage. Cheaper than wasting my can of spray!
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  #51  
Old 07-12-2018, 11:45 AM
Peter Abelard Peter Abelard is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Ken07AOVette View Post
this is going to pisoff the anti's, but the absolute best 100% effective way I have found to completely destroy a hornet nest is with a drone. Hover close wipe off later. WOW do they hate those swinging machete's!
Post vids or it didn't happen :-)
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  #52  
Old 07-12-2018, 01:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ‹berFly View Post
Just to clarify...

A poison must be inhaled, ingested, or delivered via touch, while venom is injected into a wound.
You must be my kin, haha. This distinction is important to me!


As for the original poster...

Wasp/hornet stings are venomous, but they do also bite, often to secure their footing while they sting you.

There is some limited evidence that the bite of venomous insects may contain defensive properties, but I don't think this this has been demonstrated outside of honeybees.

So, wasps do sting and when they sting, there is the mechanical injury from the stinger itself, and also a secondary envenomation. AND they may bite at the same time, which would cause mechanical injury only. But still, that's a lot of injury from a little creature!

I have only ever been stung once, by anything, which is kind of amazing when I think about it. And I am literally terrified by them, which is a little embarrassing considering my hobby.

Here is a link I think you will enjoy.
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  #53  
Old 07-12-2018, 02:53 PM
Peter Abelard Peter Abelard is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Arachnodisiac View Post
So, wasps do sting and when they sting, there is the mechanical injury from the stinger itself, and also a secondary envenomation. AND they may bite at the same time, which would cause mechanical injury only. But still, that's a lot of injury from a little creature!
Your knowledge is appreciated!

I've taken a fair number of wasp stings, and have come to suspect their stinger may be serrated, tearing on the way out, and it may go back and forth quickly like an oscillating saw.

Is this at all the case?
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  #54  
Old 07-13-2018, 02:03 AM
Jays toyz Jays toyz is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arachnodisiac View Post
You must be my kin, haha. This distinction is important to me!


As for the original poster...

Wasp/hornet stings are venomous, but they do also bite, often to secure their footing while they sting you.

There is some limited evidence that the bite of venomous insects may contain defensive properties, but I don't think this this has been demonstrated outside of honeybees.

So, wasps do sting and when they sting, there is the mechanical injury from the stinger itself, and also a secondary envenomation. AND they may bite at the same time, which would cause mechanical injury only. But still, that's a lot of injury from a little creature!

I have only ever been stung once, by anything, which is kind of amazing when I think about it. And I am literally terrified by them, which is a little embarrassing considering my hobby.

Here is a link I think you will enjoy.
As to the original post, the envenomation via stings produce hot itchy bumps, the bite however was more like a spider bite and It produced necrosis of the tissue over the following week. I was bit in the palm by a large ugly brown spider in Gibsons that did the same. Seemed like it would never heal.
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  #55  
Old 07-13-2018, 03:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jays toyz View Post
I was stung and bit by a bald faced hornet (not a hornet) multiple times recently, because they are *******s that hate brush saws. It was without a doubt the most painful sting I have had and I get stung every year by yellowjackets often by a few at a time. With the diameter of a tennis ball it felt like a second degree burn that was covered in mosquito bites that had hives. Now I have a hole where the ******* bit me. So the question to the wealth of knowledge that is this forum.
Is the bite of a wasp poisonous?

Read almost every post in the 2 pages......don't think anyone mentioned.....could it have laid eggs in you ? You mentioned a hole .....
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  #56  
Old 07-13-2018, 04:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jays toyz View Post
As to the original post, the envenomation via stings produce hot itchy bumps, the bite however was more like a spider bite and It produced necrosis of the tissue over the following week. I was bit in the palm by a large ugly brown spider in Gibsons that did the same. Seemed like it would never heal.
Often, the necrosis is simply caused by existing bacteria on the skin that gets introduced inside our bodies by the mechanical injury. Itís usually staph.
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  #57  
Old 07-13-2018, 04:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Abelard View Post
Your knowledge is appreciated!

I've taken a fair number of wasp stings, and have come to suspect their stinger may be serrated, tearing on the way out, and it may go back and forth quickly like an oscillating saw.

Is this at all the case?
Thanks! I donít really know much about these - mostly I know spiders.
From a quick search it looks like some wasp stingers are smooth and some are a little barbed, but not in comparison to bees. Hope that helps.
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  #58  
Old 07-13-2018, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken07AOVette View Post
this is going to pisoff the anti's, but the absolute best 100% effective way I have found to completely destroy a hornet nest is with a drone. Hover close wipe off later. WOW do they hate those swinging machete's!
As cool as that is, it might destroy the nest, but if you don't kill them all, won't they just set up elsewhere?
Best way I know is wait till night, when they're all inside the nest, then shoot their nest full of that expanding foam wasp killer. Kills the whole colony, all the eggs, and the queen.
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