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Old 06-02-2017, 07:40 PM
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millsboy79 millsboy79 is offline
 
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Question Asking Permission for Land Access

I was hoping to get some suggestions on asking for access to water from those of you that have done it successfully in the past.

Some hurdles I am expecting are gates and no trespassing signs.

I would think that if there is no phone number there then you are basically out of luck?

Also do you just walk up in your waders and knock on the door with a sad look in your eyes and your hat in your hands? I would expect that popular places like Bearspaw the people will have none of it and you may not want to waste your time.

I know there must be a knack to it I have just never done it before.

Thanks
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Old 06-02-2017, 08:15 PM
waterhawk waterhawk is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by millsboy79 View Post
I was hoping to get some suggestions on asking for access to water from those of you that have done it successfully in the past.

Some hurdles I am expecting are gates and no trespassing signs.

I would think that if there is no phone number there then you are basically out of luck?

Also do you just walk up in your waders and knock on the door with a sad look in your eyes and your hat in your hands? I would expect that popular places like Bearspaw the people will have none of it and you may not want to waste your time.

I know there must be a knack to it I have just never done it before.

Thanks
On the gate and no trespassing issue, get a county map and you should be able to figure out whose farmyard you art at. Go to 411 and see if you can get a phone number. Should work in most cases.
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Old 06-02-2017, 08:15 PM
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Flieguy Flieguy is offline
 
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be polite, introduce yourself and shake their hand, take off your sunglasses.

worst they can say is no
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Old 06-02-2017, 09:31 PM
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italk2u italk2u is offline
 
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Just ask! The worst they can say is "no".
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Old 06-03-2017, 07:14 AM
SNAPFisher SNAPFisher is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Flieguy View Post
be polite, introduce yourself and shake their hand, take off your sunglasses.

worst they can say is no
Yep! I can tell you they will appreciate if you ask because 99.9999999% do not. Usually that should get you access - I know I would if you came asking
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  #6  
Old 06-11-2017, 08:55 AM
Don Andersen Don Andersen is offline
 
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A couple of thoughts:

1) present yourself. No jacked up trucks, cameo, black guns, alcohol or the like.
2) be respectful. Don't show up at meal times.
3) politely ask if you can tresspass.
4) if you receive permission ask where to park, the rules for access ( most landowners don't want fires on their land) any issues with livestock, where to walk ( stomping across a field may not be a good idea.
5) be off the property before dark.
6) leave your name, where you are from and contact number.
7) if you see something amiss, find the landowner and tell them.
8) treat be property as if you owned it.
9) if there is work going on that you can help with ask if they would like assistance.
10) learn to Hunker and Chew.

Thank the landowner.
Return within a week and again ask permission. The landowner's confidence in you will build a relationship.

Many landowner's will provide other opportunities for fishing, hunting or info to other properties.


Asking permission is like any other skill. Takes time to learn and pays huge benefits.

Don
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Old 06-11-2017, 10:43 AM
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goose slayer10 goose slayer10 is offline
 
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If you have a kid you can bring with you that can be a big kicker, otherwise like guys said be polite present yourself well, layout what you want to do etc.
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  #8  
Old 06-11-2017, 04:46 PM
SNAPFisher SNAPFisher is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Andersen View Post
A couple of thoughts:

1) present yourself. No jacked up trucks, cameo, black guns, alcohol or the like.
2) be respectful. Don't show up at meal times.
3) politely ask if you can tresspass.
4) if you receive permission ask where to park, the rules for access ( most landowners don't want fires on their land) any issues with livestock, where to walk ( stomping across a field may not be a good idea.
5) be off the property before dark.
6) leave your name, where you are from and contact number.
7) if you see something amiss, find the landowner and tell them.
8) treat be property as if you owned it.
9) if there is work going on that you can help with ask if they would like assistance.
10) learn to Hunker and Chew.

Thank the landowner.
Return within a week and again ask permission. The landowner's confidence in you will build a relationship.

Many landowner's will provide other opportunities for fishing, hunting or info to other properties.


Asking permission is like any other skill. Takes time to learn and pays huge benefits.

Don
Now that is a great way to put it. I'll do the same myself if I get in that situation.
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  #9  
Old 06-13-2017, 11:27 AM
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Fishfinder Fishfinder is offline
 
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Great thread and great replies folks. I've only asked a land owner twice and both said yes. I asked where I could park and made sure to not walk across any farmland. However, I had worked on their houses previously, so that was kinda my "in".

I tour the crowsnest/old man/FTR area annually and every year I wonder about this. There are MANY stretches that I want to hit up (old man specifically) but have never actually parked the vehicle and walked up to a home to ask if I can park on their land, then walk, and fish. I just drive by and wonder. Lol.

I've heard it helps to have a small offering.
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  #10  
Old 06-13-2017, 11:36 AM
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MrDave MrDave is offline
 
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I grew up farming, so I can talk about anything. Helps if you have the gift of gab.

Thing I want to warn you about, is crime. The rural areas are getting hard hit. The odds are you will be guarded with suspicion. Leave a note if you can, with a phone number. It will give the land owner the feeling they know you aren't scouting for easy picking, plus you may get a callback.
You will likely end up on camera, stopping in yards. Things are getting scary around here.

Also pick any garbage along the way. The better you treat the ones that let you on, the better the odds his neighbor will too.
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