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  #1  
Old 09-09-2016, 10:44 AM
golfnolsen golfnolsen is offline
 
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Location: Raymond, Alberta
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Default Reloading - Bullet Weights

To all the experienced reloaders out there I'm in need of your wisdom.
I measured up my Barnes 180 TSX last night and I grouped their weights so that I could eliminate big variances in my reloads. The question is... Will there be a noticeable difference in point of impact if the weights vary 0.1 grains up or down. (I wouldn't think so, but I had to ask).

I did notice I had some come in at 179.3 up to 180.4. So I ask the same question again... At 1.1 grain difference would that also cause a problem.

(The gun is a SAKO A7 300 WSM. Legend HD 4.5-14x42 scope. PWR Rings. Winchester Nickel Brass. Fed215 Primers. 65.5 Grains of RL-17. Chrony test shows 3150 FPS average. I shoot off a lead sled and try to remember good technique. I understand that the gun will be more accurate than my ability, but the goal is to be as accurate as I can at least once or twice for load development and sighting in my scope. Also I understand in almost all hunting situations it won't matter what I did on paper.)

Thanks in advance for the help. I just want to ease my paranoia.
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  #2  
Old 09-09-2016, 11:32 AM
chuck chuck is offline
 
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That weight variance is the least of your worries.
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  #3  
Old 09-09-2016, 11:50 AM
Ebrand Ebrand is online now
 
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Default You can load them all in one batch and never know the difference.

Load them up and shoot them.

Figure out percentage of the variable of 1.1 grains in the bullet. It is less than 1%. Add in the accuracy variable in your scale.

I cannot control. 1 percent variable in temperature/altitude/wind direction/wind speed/figuring exact distance to target/the way I look through a scope. And about 7 other variables with any shot.

These things make the less than 1 percent variation in weight negligible.

For a hunting rifle in outdoor conditions shooting more (practice for you) is way more valuable in improving the quality of one shot than dealing with one percent variation in bullet weight.

I am an Accubond fan. Never got that much difference from Nosler bullets. Never used Barnes so I don't know if that is the norm or if you got a poor batch. Email Barnes. See what they have to say.
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Old 09-09-2016, 11:52 AM
Ebrand Ebrand is online now
 
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Default You can load them all in one batch and never know the difference.

Load them up and shoot them.

Figure out percentage of the variable of 1.1 grains in the bullet. It is less than 1%. Add in the accuracy variable in your scale.

I cannot control. 1 percent variable in temperature/altitude/wind direction/wind speed/figuring exact distance to target/the way I look through a scope. And about 7 other variables with any shot.

These things make the less than 1 percent variation in weight negligible.

For a hunting rifle in outdoor conditions shooting more (practice for you) is way more valuable in improving the quality of one shot than dealing with one percent variation in bullet weight.

I am an Accubond fan. Never got that much difference from Nosler bullets. Never used Barnes so I don't know if that is the norm or if you got a poor batch. Email Barnes. See what they have to say.

My Sako rifles shoot way better than I do. Get out and shoot.
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  #5  
Old 09-09-2016, 01:05 PM
golfnolsen golfnolsen is offline
 
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Default Thanks

Thanks for the insight. The 1% thing makes a lot of sense. I plan to shoot all of them anyway. There are a few trophy rocks out there that need to be shot at. This just eases my paranoia. I won't worry about it anymore.
Shoot straight people and have a great season. Now to tip over a few for 2016.
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  #6  
Old 09-09-2016, 02:27 PM
densa44 densa44 is offline
 
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Smile Your Paranoia

I don't know if this will help or not. Chuck has it right. This is the least of your worries.

To get better accuracy, what I find helps the most is, not waving the barrel around.
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  #7  
Old 09-09-2016, 03:44 PM
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tikka250 tikka250 is offline
 
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If you want better groups getting rid of the lead sled and shooting off a proper rest/bag will do way more than that tiny variance in bullet weight.
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  #8  
Old 09-09-2016, 07:01 PM
gitrdun gitrdun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tikka250 View Post
If you want better groups getting rid of the lead sled and shooting off a proper rest/bag will do way more than that tiny variance in bullet weight.
Absolutely correct. Led sleds are the cause of many cracked stocks behind the recoil lug or/and at the rear action screw.
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Old 09-09-2016, 07:26 PM
elkhunter11 elkhunter11 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gitrdun View Post
Absolutely correct. Led sleds are the cause of many cracked stocks behind the recoil lug or/and at the rear action screw.
Not to mention that they can effect by point of impact, so you need to verify the final sight in with out a leads sled.
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Old 09-09-2016, 07:38 PM
gitrdun gitrdun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkhunter11 View Post
Not to mention that they can effect by point of impact, so you need to verify the final sight in with out a leads sled.
I actually have one that I build several years ago. It's pretty heavy on it's own, like 30 lbs. I'd gladly give it away to some guy who wants one.
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  #11  
Old 09-09-2016, 08:42 PM
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sns2 sns2 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by densa44 View Post
I don't know if this will help or not. Chuck has it right. This is the least of your worries.

To get better accuracy, what I find helps the most is, not waving the barrel around.
ROFL. Good one
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  #12  
Old 09-10-2016, 05:50 PM
golfnolsen golfnolsen is offline
 
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Default Good enough for now

This might not bet good enough for some, but it's good enough for me. Next weekend opener is coming fast. 4, 1" groups from a cold barrel. Maybe in the future I'll fine tune the powder and seating depth, but not enough time to keep tinkering.

4 times in a row My first 2 shots were almost touching and on dead center. As this is my hunting rifle... If I get to a third shot on an animal I will have more issues than pulling it a bit at 100 yards.

Thanks for the advice fellas.
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